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1. Payne S, Doyal L: Older women, work and health. Occup Med (Lond); 2010 May;60(3):172-7
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  • [Title] Older women, work and health.
  • However, we know little about their health-the various influences on their health and the ways in which paid and unpaid work impact on both physical and mental well being.
  • This paper reviews the available literature on older women's health in the workplace, focussing on work-specific and more general risks for older women, including stress, discrimination, physical hazards and the 'double burden' of paid work and caring responsibilities.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude with a three-point research agenda, calling for more empirical work on the risks faced by older women, studies that take a life-course perspective of women's occupational health and work that explores the interactions between unpaid and paid work in later life.
  • [MeSH-major] Aging / physiology. Employment / statistics & numerical data. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Occupational Health. Women's Health. Women, Working / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Accidents, Occupational / statistics & numerical data. Aged. Female. Great Britain / epidemiology. Humans. Middle Aged. Musculoskeletal Diseases / epidemiology. Musculoskeletal Diseases / etiology. Public Policy. Socioeconomic Factors. Stress, Psychological / epidemiology. Stress, Psychological / etiology. Work / psychology. Work / statistics & numerical data. Workload


2. Willert MV, Thulstrup AM, Bonde JP: Effects of a stress management intervention on absenteeism and return to work--results from a randomized wait-list controlled trial. Scand J Work Environ Health; 2011 May;37(3):186-95
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  • [Title] Effects of a stress management intervention on absenteeism and return to work--results from a randomized wait-list controlled trial.
  • OBJECTIVE: High levels of work-related stress are associated with increased absenteeism from work and reduced work ability.
  • In this study, we investigated the effects of a stress management intervention on absenteeism and return to work.
  • Self-reported data on absenteeism (number of days full- or part-time absent from work within the previous three months) were obtained at 16, 32, and 48 weeks follow-up.
  • Register-based data on long-term absence from work were drawn from the Danish public transfer payments (DREAM) database from baseline and 48 weeks onwards.
  • For return to work, a hazard ratio of 1.58 (95% CI 0.89-2.81) favoring the intervention group was found (P=0.12).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The intervention reduces self-reported absenteeism from work.
  • No conclusive evidence was found for return to work.
  • [MeSH-major] Absenteeism. Sick Leave / statistics & numerical data. Stress, Psychological / therapy. Work / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 21057736.001).
  • [ISSN] 1795-990X
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand J Work Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] Finland
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3. Clark C, Pike C, McManus S, Harris J, Bebbington P, Brugha T, Jenkins R, Meltzer H, Weich S, Stansfeld S: The contribution of work and non-work stressors to common mental disorders in the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Psychol Med; 2012 Apr;42(4):829-42
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  • [Title] The contribution of work and non-work stressors to common mental disorders in the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey.
  • BACKGROUND: Evidence for an effect of work stressors on common mental disorders (CMD) has increased over the past decade.
  • However, studies have not considered whether the effects of work stressors on CMD remain after taking co-occurring non-work stressors into account.
  • This paper analyses data from employed working age participants (N=3383: 1804 males; 1579 females).
  • Questionnaires assessed self-reported work stressors and non-work stressors.
  • RESULTS: The effects of work stressors on CMD were not explained by co-existing non-work stressors.
  • We found independent effects of work and non-work stressors on CMD.
  • Job stress, whether conceptualized as job strain or effort-reward imbalance, together with lower levels of social support at work, recent stressful life events, domestic violence, caring responsibilities, lower levels of non-work social support, debt and poor housing quality were all independently associated with CMD.
  • Social support at home and debt did not influence the effect of work stressors on CMD.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Non-work stressors do not appear to make people more susceptible to work stressors; both contribute to CMD.
  • Tackling workplace stress is likely to benefit employee psychological health even if the employee's home life is stressful but interventions incorporating non-work stressors may also be effective.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. England / epidemiology. Epidemiologic Methods. Female. Humans. Interview, Psychological. Male. Middle Aged. Models, Psychological. Morbidity. Social Environment. Social Support. Socioeconomic Factors. Work / psychology. Workplace / psychology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 21896237.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-8978
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychological medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychol Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Department of Health / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3297357
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10. Associations between the working characteristics of nursing staff and the prevalence of behavioral symptoms in people with dementia in residential care. ...     The aim of this study was to investigate associations between work characteristics of nursing staff and prevalence of behavioral symptoms among people with dementia in residential care settings. ...     METHODS: The self-report job strain assessment scale was used to measure staff perceptions of their working environment, and the Multi Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale to measure the occurrence of behavioral symptoms among residents in 40 residential care units for people with dementia.

11. The aim of the present work was to measure the amount of stress in parents of children with epilepsy and to determine whether and how parenting stress is linked to behavioral symptoms of the children.

12. However, longitudinal and cross-sectional data are lacking, particularly for different aspects of working memory, visual perception, and non-psychotic behavioral symptoms.

13. INTRODUCTION/OBJECTIVE: Executive function (EF) impairment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may account for behavioral symptoms such as poor concentration, impaired working memory, problems in shifting among tasks, and prioritizing and planning complex sets of tasks or completing long-term projects at work or school.

17. The partial androgen deficiency of aging males (PADAM) is responsible for a variety of behavioral symptoms, such as weakness, fatigue, decreased libido, depressive mood, lack of motivation and energy, lower psychological vitality, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, decreased work and sport performances, difficulty in concentrating, memory impairment and low dominance.

19. Relations between behavioral symptoms and measures of inhibition and working memory were studied both categorically and dimensionally.

20. The role of pharmacotherapy in the management of autism and PDDs is to ameliorate behavioral symptoms that interfere with the patient's ability to participate in educational, social, work, and family systems.

27. For the assessment of behavioral symptoms affecting locomotion, social interaction and spatial working memory, the open‑field, social interaction and Morris water maze tests were conducted.

74. Previous work has suggested that animals can suppress the behavioral symptoms of sickness in order to engage in adaptive behaviors.


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4. Plaisier I, de Graaf R, de Bruijn J, Smit J, van Dyck R, Beekman A, Penninx B: Depressive and anxiety disorders on-the-job: the importance of job characteristics for good work functioning in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders. Psychiatry Res; 2012 Dec 30;200(2-3):382-8
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  • [Title] Depressive and anxiety disorders on-the-job: the importance of job characteristics for good work functioning in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders.
  • In a sample of 1522 employees (1129 persons with and 393 persons without psychopathology) participating in Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA, n=2981) we examined associations between job characteristics and work functioning (absenteeism and work performance) in multinominal logistic regression models.
  • Job characteristics were working hours, psychosocial working conditions and occupational status.
  • As expected, depressed and anxious patients were at significantly elevated risk for absenteeism and poor work performance.
  • In analyses adjusted for psychopathology, absenteeism and poor performance were significantly lower among persons reporting high job support, high job control, less working hours, self-employed and high skilled jobs.
  • High job support, high job control and reduced working hours were partially related to work functioning in both workers with- and without-psychopathology.
  • Since depressed and anxious employees are at a substantially increased risk for absenteeism and poor work performance, strategies that improve job support and feelings of control at work may be especially helpful to prevent poor work functioning in this at-risk group of employees.
  • [MeSH-minor] Absenteeism. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Job Satisfaction. Male. Middle Aged. Netherlands. Questionnaires. Work / psychology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 22862911.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-7123
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychiatry research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychiatry Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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5. Guidi S, Bagnara S, Fichera GP: The HSE indicator tool, psychological distress and work ability. Occup Med (Lond); 2012 Apr;62(3):203-9
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  • [Title] The HSE indicator tool, psychological distress and work ability.
  • BACKGROUND: The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) indicator tool is one of the most commonly used tools for assessing the risk of work-related stress.
  • Few studies, however, have investigated whether and how its scales are related to psychological distress or other work-related health outcomes.
  • AIMS: To investigate the relationship between the HSE indicator tool, psychological distress, as measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12, and work ability, assessed by the Work Ability Index (WAI).
  • Controlling for age and gender, the indicator subscales were negatively associated with the adopted measures of psychological distress and work ability.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study presents new evidence for the validity of the HSE indicator tool to estimate the risk of work-related stress and suggests that most but not all the effects of psychosocial conditions on work ability might be mediated by the level of psychological distress induced by these conditions.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Anxiety / diagnosis. Anxiety / epidemiology. Depression / diagnosis. Depression / epidemiology. Female. Humans. Italy / epidemiology. Male. Middle Aged. Psychometrics. Questionnaires. Reproducibility of Results. Work. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 22394682.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-8405
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational medicine (Oxford, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Med (Lond)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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6. Shields M: Shift work and health. Health Rep; 2002 Jul;13(4):11-33
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  • [Title] Shift work and health.
  • Based on an analysis of people followed over four years, associations between the incidence of chronic conditions and changes in psychological distress levels are explored in relation to working shift.
  • DATA SOURCES: Data are from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey, the longitudinal (1994/95, 1996/97 and 1998/99) and cross-sectional (1994/95) components of the National Population Health Survey, and the Survey of Work Arrangements (1991 and 1995).
  • Multivariate analyses were used to examine associations between shift work and the incidence of chronic conditions and changes in psychological distress levels over four years, controlling for other potential confounders.
  • MAIN RESULTS: Men who worked an evening, rotating or irregular shift had increased odds of reporting having been diagnosed with a chronic condition over a four-year period.
  • [MeSH-major] Work Schedule Tolerance

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  • (PMID = 15069802.001).
  • [ISSN] 0840-6529
  • [Journal-full-title] Health reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
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7. Wheeler LA, Updegraff KA, Crouter A: Work and Mexican American parent-adolescent relationships: the mediating role of parent well-being. J Fam Psychol; 2011 Feb;25(1):107-16
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  • [Title] Work and Mexican American parent-adolescent relationships: the mediating role of parent well-being.
  • This study of Mexican American two-parent families (N = 246) examined the role of parents' well-being (i.e., depressive symptoms, role overload) as a potential mechanism through which parent occupational conditions (i.e., self-direction, hazardous conditions, physical activity, work pressure) are linked to parent-adolescent relationship qualities (i.e., warmth, conflict, disclosure).
  • Depressive symptoms mediated the links between maternal and paternal work pressure and parent-adolescent warmth, conflict, and disclosure.
  • For mothers, depressive symptoms also mediated the links between self-direction and mother-adolescent warmth, conflict, and disclosure; for fathers, role overload mediated the links between work pressure and hazardous conditions with father-adolescent warmth.
  • [MeSH-major] Adolescent Behavior / psychology. Depression / psychology. Parent-Child Relations. Parents / psychology. Work / psychology

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  • [Copyright] PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 21355651.001).
  • [ISSN] 1939-1293
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Fam Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD039666; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01 HD039666-05A1; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R01HD39666
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS258487; NLM/ PMC3548600
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8. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Manufactured Objects' associated with 'Behavioral Symptoms Point In Time Patient': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; ManufacturedObject;BehavioralSymptomsPoint:707221867. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/6/6
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  • [Title] 'Manufactured Objects' associated with 'Behavioral Symptoms Point In Time Patient': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Manufactured Object' for 'behavioral symptoms point in time patient'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Manufactured Object'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 36 publications, and group two 220474 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Cooper IF et al: 'Steroids' associated with 'Behavioral Symptoms Point In Time Patient': Top Publications.
  • Rakowski W et al: Daily symptoms and behavioral responses. Results of a health diary with older adults.
  • Pitkala KH et al: Behavioral symptoms and the administration of psychotropic drugs to aged patients with dementia in nursing homes and in acute geriatric wards.
  • Griffiths KL et al: Behavioral and psychophysiological responses to job demands and association with musculoskeletal symptoms in computer work.
  • Hollingworth P et al: Four components describe behavioral symptoms in 1,120 individuals with late-onset Alzheimer's disease.
  • Kimura T et al: Two cases of Alzheimer's disease showing deterioration of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia induced by switching from rivastigmine to donepezil.
  • Clarke G et al: Randomized effectiveness trial of an Internet, pure self-help, cognitive behavioral intervention for depressive symptoms in young adults.
  • Donker T et al: Internet-delivered interpersonal psychotherapy versus internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depressive symptoms: randomized controlled noninferiority trial.
  • Sasaki S et al: The Effects of an Uninterrupted Switch from Donepezil to Galantamine without Dose Titration on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease.
  • Onishi J et al: Behavioral, psychological and physical symptoms in group homes for older adults with dementia.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 707221867.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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9. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Mental or Behavioral Dysfunctions' associated with 'Quality Of Work': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; MentalOrBehavioral;QualityOfWork:705284712. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/8/28
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  • [Title] 'Mental or Behavioral Dysfunctions' associated with 'Quality Of Work': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction' for 'quality of work'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 17 publications, and group two 22995 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Erman MK et al: Modafinil for excessive sleepiness associated with chronic shift work sleep disorder: effects on patient functioning and health-related quality of life.
  • Bryson G et al: Quality of life benefits of paid work activity in schizophrenia.
  • Priebe S et al: Employment, attitudes toward work, and quality of life among people with schizophrenia in three countries.
  • van der Doef M et al: The Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire: its construction, factor structure, and psychometric qualities.
  • Lanctôt N et al: The quality of work life of people with severe mental disorders working in social enterprises: a qualitative study.
  • Dravecky ET et al: Improving the quality of work and productivity through the self-designing team concept: the case of Sunset-Kaiser's drug and alcohol dependency program.
  • Schnurr PP et al: Work-related quality of life and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among female veterans.
  • Mauvieux B et al: [A study comparing circadian rhythm and sleep quality of athletes and sedentary subjects engaged in night work].
  • Holzner B et al: The impact of work-related rehabilitation on the quality of life of patients with schizophrenia.
  • Sørensen E: [Quality assurance of psychiatric work with autistic children and adolescents. Diagnostic value of medical examination].

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 705284712.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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10. Edvardsson D, Sandman PO, Nay R, Karlsson S: Associations between the working characteristics of nursing staff and the prevalence of behavioral symptoms in people with dementia in residential care. Int Psychogeriatr; 2008 Aug;20(4):764-76
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  • [Title] Associations between the working characteristics of nursing staff and the prevalence of behavioral symptoms in people with dementia in residential care.
  • BACKGROUND: Clinical experience suggests that the work characteristics of staff in residential care may influence the well-being of residents with dementia.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate associations between work characteristics of nursing staff and prevalence of behavioral symptoms among people with dementia in residential care settings.
  • METHODS: The self-report job strain assessment scale was used to measure staff perceptions of their working environment, and the Multi Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale to measure the occurrence of behavioral symptoms among residents in 40 residential care units for people with dementia.
  • RESULTS: The findings show that in settings where staff reported high job strain, the prevalence of behavioral symptoms was significantly higher compared to settings where staff reported low job strain.
  • There was no statistically significant association between staff members' self-reported knowledge in caring for people with dementia and prevalence of behavioral symptoms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Nurse-Patient Relations. Personality Inventory. Risk Factors. Statistics as Topic. Sweden

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  • (PMID = 18304386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1041-6102
  • [Journal-full-title] International psychogeriatrics / IPA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Psychogeriatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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11. Farrace D, Tommasi M, Casadio C, Verrotti A: Parenting stress evaluation and behavioral syndromes in a group of pediatric patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav; 2013 Oct;29(1):222-7
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  • [Title] Parenting stress evaluation and behavioral syndromes in a group of pediatric patients with epilepsy.
  • The aim of the present work was to measure the amount of stress in parents of children with epilepsy and to determine whether and how parenting stress is linked to behavioral symptoms of the children.
  • Parenting stress was measured with the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) and behavioral symptoms with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).
  • Epilepsy caused a high level of parenting stress and of problematic behaviors since the behavioral symptoms predicting the degree of parenting stress significantly differed between healthy children and children with epilepsy.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms / etiology. Epilepsy / complications. Parent-Child Relations. Parenting / psychology. Stress, Psychological / etiology

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  • [Copyright] © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 24034672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-5069
  • [Journal-full-title] Epilepsy & behavior : E&B
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epilepsy Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Behavioral syndrome / Epilepsy / Parenting stress / Pediatric patients
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12. Simard M, van Reekum R, Cohen T: A review of the cognitive and behavioral symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci; 2000;12(4):425-50
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  • [Title] A review of the cognitive and behavioral symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies.
  • To clarify the future research agenda in this area, the authors critically appraise the literature on cognitive and behavioral changes in DLB and provide a brief overview of the history of DLB, the main pathological changes, and the findings related to extrapyramidal symptoms and treatment issues.
  • Twenty-one studies on cognition and 47 on behavioral changes in DLB are reviewed.
  • Impairments of working memory and visuospatial functions, visual hallucinations, and depression (or symptoms of depression such as apathy and anxiety) have been identified as early indicators of DLB.
  • However, longitudinal and cross-sectional data are lacking, particularly for different aspects of working memory, visual perception, and non-psychotic behavioral symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 11083160.001).
  • [ISSN] 0895-0172
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 168
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13. Brown TE, Brams M, Gao J, Gasior M, Childress A: Open-label administration of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate improves executive function impairments and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults. Postgrad Med; 2010 Sep;122(5):7-17
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  • [Title] Open-label administration of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate improves executive function impairments and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults.
  • INTRODUCTION/OBJECTIVE: Executive function (EF) impairment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may account for behavioral symptoms such as poor concentration, impaired working memory, problems in shifting among tasks, and prioritizing and planning complex sets of tasks or completing long-term projects at work or school.
  • METHODS: Executive function behavior was assessed using the Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder Scale (BADDS) during the 4-week open-label dose-optimization phase prior to a 2-period, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of LDX (30-70 mg/day).
  • The ADHD Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS-IV) with adult prompts assessed ADHD symptoms.
  • Change in EF behavioral symptoms was evaluated based on week 4 BADDS total and cluster scores; analyses of shifts from baseline among subjects with BADDS scores < 50, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, and ≥ 70; and scores less than or greater than baseline 90% confidence range (eg, reliably improved or worsened, respectively).
  • [MeSH-major] Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / drug therapy. Central Nervous System Stimulants / administration & dosage. Dextroamphetamine / administration & dosage. Executive Function


14. Park J, Yi Y, Kim Y: Weekly work hours and stress complaints of workers in Korea. Am J Ind Med; 2010 Nov;53(11):1135-41
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  • [Title] Weekly work hours and stress complaints of workers in Korea.
  • BACKGROUND: Koreans typically work long hours.
  • We herein analyze the relationship between the level of working hours and extent of stress complaints.
  • METHODS: We analyzed stress complaints with respect to hours worked per week, as reported by 7,075 subjects, using data from the 2006 First Korean Working Conditions Survey.
  • Subjects were categorized as those working fewer than 40 hr per week (short working hours, SWH); those working 40-47 hr per week (intermediate working hours, IWH); those working 48-59 hr per week (long working hours, LWH); or those working at least 60 hr per week (very long working hours, VLWH).
  • [MeSH-major] Stress, Psychological / psychology. Work / psychology. Work Schedule Tolerance / psychology

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20665532.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0274
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of industrial medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Ind. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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15. Mintz J, Mintz LI, Arruda MJ, Hwang SS: Treatments of depression and the functional capacity to work. Arch Gen Psychiatry; 1992 Oct;49(10):761-8
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  • [Title] Treatments of depression and the functional capacity to work.
  • This study evaluated the effects of antidepressants and psychotherapy on work impairment in depressed patients.
  • Functional work impairment was common at baseline, manifested by unemployment (11%) or on-the-job performance problems (absenteeism, decreased productivity, interpersonal problems, 44%).
  • Generally, work outcomes were good when treatment was symptomatically effective, but the trajectories of work restoration and symptom remission were different, with work recovery appearing to take considerably longer.
  • [MeSH-major] Depressive Disorder / therapy. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Absenteeism. Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Efficiency. Employment. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Prognosis. Psychotherapy. Treatment Outcome. Work Capacity Evaluation

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  • [ErratumIn] Arch Gen Psychiatry 1993 Mar;50(3):241
  • (PMID = 1417427.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-990X
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of general psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Gen. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic
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16. Spector PE, Bauer JA, Fox S: Measurement artifacts in the assessment of counterproductive work behavior and organizational citizenship behavior: do we know what we think we know? J Appl Psychol; 2010 Jul;95(4):781-90
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  • [Title] Measurement artifacts in the assessment of counterproductive work behavior and organizational citizenship behavior: do we know what we think we know?
  • An experiment investigated whether measurement features affected observed relationships between counterproductive work behavior (CWB) and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and their relationships with other variables.
  • [MeSH-major] Social Behavior. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 20604597.001).
  • [ISSN] 1939-1854
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of applied psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Appl Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Amore M: Partial androgen deficiency and neuropsychiatric symptoms in aging men. J Endocrinol Invest; 2005;28(11 Suppl Proceedings):49-54
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  • [Title] Partial androgen deficiency and neuropsychiatric symptoms in aging men.
  • The partial androgen deficiency of aging males (PADAM) is responsible for a variety of behavioral symptoms, such as weakness, fatigue, decreased libido, depressive mood, lack of motivation and energy, lower psychological vitality, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, decreased work and sport performances, difficulty in concentrating, memory impairment and low dominance.
  • Psychological and behavioral aspects of PADAM overlap with signs and symptoms of major depression.
  • The etiology of the behavioral symptoms of PADAM is multifactorial, being the result of the interaction of biological and social changes, and of the personal ability to adapt to the numerous individual and social changes that take place during mid-life transition.

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  • (PMID = 16760626.001).
  • [ISSN] 0391-4097
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endocrinological investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endocrinol. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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18. Louis ED: Behavioral symptoms associated with essential tremor. Adv Neurol; 2005;96:284-90
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  • [Title] Behavioral symptoms associated with essential tremor.
  • Further work is needed to define the extent of the nonmotor manifestations, their presence or absence in the predisease state, and their progression over time.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms / etiology. Essential Tremor / complications

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  • (PMID = 16383227.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS39422; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS42859
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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19. Skogan AH, Zeiner P, Egeland J, Rohrer-Baumgartner N, Urnes AG, Reichborn-Kjennerud T, Aase H: Inhibition and working memory in young preschool children with symptoms of ADHD and/or oppositional-defiant disorder. Child Neuropsychol; 2014;20(5):607-24
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  • [Title] Inhibition and working memory in young preschool children with symptoms of ADHD and/or oppositional-defiant disorder.
  • BACKGROUND: Early symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) are associated with deficits in cognitive self-regulatory processes or executive functions (EF)s.
  • The present study investigated associations between symptoms of ADHD and/or ODD and two core EFs, inhibition and working memory, in a large nonclinical sample of 3-year old children.
  • Relations between behavioral symptoms and measures of inhibition and working memory were studied both categorically and dimensionally.
  • RESULTS: Children with co-occurring symptoms of ADHD and ODD performed at a significantly lower level than typically developing children in 4 out of 5 EF measures.
  • Symptoms of ADHD, both alone and in combination with ODD, were associated with reduced performance on tests of inhibition in the group comparisons.
  • The associations between test results and behavioral symptoms remained significant after gender and verbal skills had been controlled.
  • CONCLUSION: Young preschoolers show the same pattern of relations between EF and behavioral symptoms of ADHD and/or ODD as previously described in older children diagnosed with ADHD and/or ODD.
  • [MeSH-major] Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / psychology. Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders / psychology. Executive Function. Inhibition (Psychology). Memory, Short-Term

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  • (PMID = 24053105.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-4136
  • [Journal-full-title] Child neuropsychology : a journal on normal and abnormal development in childhood and adolescence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Neuropsychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 1 UO1 NS047537-01; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 2 UO1 NS047537-06A1; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / N0-ES75558
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ADHD / Development / Executive functions / ODD / Preschool children
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20. Gilman JT, Tuchman RF: Autism and associated behavioral disorders: pharmacotherapeutic intervention. Ann Pharmacother; 1995 Jan;29(1):47-56
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  • [Title] Autism and associated behavioral disorders: pharmacotherapeutic intervention.
  • DATA SYNTHESIS: Autism and PDDs are severe developmental disabilities defined by behavioral criteria.
  • Behavioral manifestations of patients with autism include core deficits in social interaction, communication, and imaginative activities, with a restricted repertoire of activities and interests.
  • The role of pharmacotherapy in the management of autism and PDDs is to ameliorate behavioral symptoms that interfere with the patient's ability to participate in educational, social, work, and family systems.
  • Present pharmacotherapeutic intervention seeks to resolve behavioral symptoms.
  • Treatment of autism and PDDs requires appropriate delineation of the behaviors and neurobiologic disorders associated with each patient.

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  • (PMID = 7711345.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 88
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21. Ekerdt DJ, DeViney S: Evidence for a preretirement process among older male workers. J Gerontol; 1993 Mar;48(2):S35-43
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  • Using 4-wave, 9-year (1978-1987) panel data on 1,365 nonretired male workers aged 50-69, attitudes about job tension and fatigue were examined along the dimension of self-reported proximity (time-left) to retirement.
  • Results from pooled time-series analysis showed that men evaluated their jobs as more burdensome when drawing closer to a fixed age for retirement, regardless of age and other factors.
  • This is evidence for a preretirement dynamic, and it encourages the notion that time-left at work organizes the experience of older workers.
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Aged. Cohort Studies. Family. Fatigue / physiopathology. Health Status. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Stress, Physiological / physiopathology. Stress, Psychological / physiopathology. Time Factors. Work

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  • (PMID = 8473704.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-1422
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gerontology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gerontol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / 1R01-AG08882
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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22. Marcatto F, D'Errico G, Di Blas L, Ferrante D: [Assessing work-related stress: an Italian adaptation of the HSE Management Standards Work-Related Stress Indicator Tool]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon; 2011 Oct-Dec;33(4):403-8
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  • [Title] [Assessing work-related stress: an Italian adaptation of the HSE Management Standards Work-Related Stress Indicator Tool].
  • [Transliterated title] La valutazione dello stress lavoro correlato: adattamento italiano dell'HSE Management Standards Work-Related Stress Indicator Tool.
  • The aim of this paper is to present a preliminary validation of an Italian adaptation of the HSE Management Standards Work-Related Stress Indicator Tool (IT), an instrument for assessing work-related stress at the organizational level, originally developed in Britain by the Health and Safety Executive.
  • A scale that assesses the physical work environment has been added to the original version of the IT.
  • Further psychometric analysis showed adequate internal consistency of the IT scales and good criterion validity, as evidenced by the correlations with self-perception of stress, work satisfaction and motivation.
  • In conclusion, the Indicator Tool proved to be a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of work-related stress at the organizational level, and it is also compatible with the instructions provided by the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy (Circular letter 18/11/2010).

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  • (PMID = 22452098.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-7830
  • [Journal-full-title] Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Ital Med Lav Ergon
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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23. Lopes CS, Araya R, Werneck GL, Chor D, Faerstein E: Job strain and other work conditions: relationships with psychological distress among civil servants in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol; 2010 Mar;45(3):345-54
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  • [Title] Job strain and other work conditions: relationships with psychological distress among civil servants in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
  • BACKGROUND: In developing countries, traditional sources of employment and work practices have changed rapidly and work environment has appeared as an important factor associated with an increased prevalence of mental disorders in these countries.
  • AIMS: To investigate the association between job strain and other work characteristics with psychological distress, and to estimate the contextual effects of different working environments on psychological distress, using cross-sectional data from an occupational cohort.
  • METHODS: The subjects were 3,574 non-faculty civil servants working at university campuses in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Pró-Saúde Study).
  • Work characteristics were measured by the modified version of the Karasek model and through questions about night shift work and occupational status.
  • RESULTS: After adjusting for age, education, income and other work characteristics, low social support at work and high job strain were associated with psychological distress.
  • For low social support, the association was stronger in men (Prevalence Ratio = 2.02; 95% Confidence Interval 1.6-2.6) than in women (PR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.2-1.4).
  • High job strain was similarly significant in both women (PR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.2-1.7) and men (PR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.0-1.7).
  • Men having a routine non-manual work presented 29% more psychological distress than those undertaking professional roles.
  • Night shift work did not show significant association with psychological distress.
  • In the multilevel analysis, the prevalence of psychological distress did not vary significantly across work units.
  • CONCLUSION: Job strain and poor support at work seem important psychological stressors in the workplace in Brazil.
  • Our findings are comparable to those found in more developed countries, providing additional evidence of an association between an adverse psychosocial work environment and psychological distress, being thus useful for policymakers in planning and promoting healthier and happier working force necessary for economic development.
  • [MeSH-major] Stress, Psychological / epidemiology. Work / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Brazil / epidemiology. Cohort Studies. Cross-Sectional Studies. Economic Development. Employment / psychology. Female. Health Status. Humans. Male. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / psychology. Prevalence. Questionnaires. Sex Factors. Social Support. Socioeconomic Factors. Work Schedule Tolerance. Workload / psychology. Workplace / psychology

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  • (PMID = 19452108.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-9285
  • [Journal-full-title] Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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24. Cooper CL: The changing nature of work: workplace stress and strategies to deal with it. Med Lav; 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):132-6
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  • [Title] The changing nature of work: workplace stress and strategies to deal with it.
  • Workplace stress is costing the developed and developing world roughly between 5-10% of Gross National Product per annum in sickness absence, premature retirement due to ill health and lost productive value in terms of services and products.
  • [MeSH-major] Occupational Diseases / etiology. Stress, Psychological / etiology. Work. Workplace
  • [MeSH-minor] Absenteeism. Data Collection. Disease Management. Employment / psychology. Forecasting. Great Britain / epidemiology. Humans. Job Satisfaction. Personnel Management / trends. Private Sector / trends. United States / epidemiology. Work Schedule Tolerance / psychology. Workload / psychology

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  • (PMID = 17017336.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-7818
  • [Journal-full-title] La Medicina del lavoro
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Lav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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25. O'hagan FT, Thomas SG: Work adjustment in cardiovascular disease: job characteristics and social support. J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev; 2011 Nov-Dec;31(6):358-64
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  • [Title] Work adjustment in cardiovascular disease: job characteristics and social support.
  • PURPOSE: To better understand social influences on work recovery, we studied the association between work status, work adjustment (WA), job demands, and social support (employer, family, physician) for return to work in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients.
  • METHODS: Multiple cross-sectional design with questionnaire data collected from patients (72% working; age = 57 ± 10.7 years) either at program entry (n = 126) or 6 to 12 months (n = 88) of CR exposure.
  • Work adjustment was assessed by utilizing a visual analogue scale (WA VAS).
  • Perceived social support from the employer, family, and physician was assessed using 5-point Likert scales.
  • RESULTS: Working patients expressed higher levels of employer support (4.2 ± 1.2 vs 3.6 ± 1.4, P < .04) and lower PD (7.9 ± 3.4 vs 10.5 ± 4.0, P < .001) than those not working.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that CR patients view their employer as a significant source of social support for return to work.
  • The nature of the supportive relationship requires further investigation to determine the salient aspects that impact on work adjustment.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Cardiovascular Diseases / rehabilitation. Job Satisfaction. Social Support. Work / psychology. Workload / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cross-Sectional Studies. Employment / psychology. Family / psychology. Female. Humans. Job Description. Male. Middle Aged. Physician-Patient Relations. Questionnaires. Stress, Psychological / etiology. Stress, Psychological / psychology

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  • (PMID = 21826018.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-751X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and prevention
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. Saxbe DE, Repetti RL, Graesch AP: Time spent in housework and leisure: links with parents' physiological recovery from work. J Fam Psychol; 2011 Apr;25(2):271-81
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  • [Title] Time spent in housework and leisure: links with parents' physiological recovery from work.
  • Spouses' balancing of housework and leisure activities at home may affect their recovery from work.
  • For women, the most frequently pursued activities at home were housework, communication, and leisure; husbands spent the most time in leisure activities, followed by communication and housework.
  • Spouses differed in their total time at home and their proportion of time devoted to leisure and housework activities, with wives observed more often in housework and husbands observed more often in leisure activities.
  • Both wives and husbands who devoted more time to housework had higher levels of evening cortisol and weaker afternoon-to-evening recovery.
  • For wives, husbands' increased housework time also predicted stronger evening cortisol recovery.
  • When both spouses' activities were entered in the same model, leisure predicted husbands' evening cortisol, such that husbands who apportioned more time to leisure, and whose wives apportioned less time to leisure, showed stronger after-work recovery.
  • These results suggest that the division of labor within couples may have implications for physical health.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Housekeeping. Leisure Activities / psychology. Parents / psychology. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Work / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Employment / psychology. Family Relations. Female. Gender Identity. Humans. Hydrocortisone / metabolism. Male. Middle Aged. Pacific States. Saliva / metabolism. Spouses / psychology. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 21480706.001).
  • [ISSN] 1939-1293
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Fam Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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27. Kim TW, Kang HS, Park JK, Lee SJ, Baek SB, Kim CJ: Voluntary wheel running ameliorates symptoms of MK-801-induced schizophrenia in mice. Mol Med Rep; 2014 Dec;10(6):2924-30
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  • [Title] Voluntary wheel running ameliorates symptoms of MK-801-induced schizophrenia in mice.
  • In the present study, we investigated in vivo the effects of voluntary wheel running on behavioral symptoms associated with NMDA receptor expression, using MK‑801‑induced schizophrenic mice.
  • For the assessment of behavioral symptoms affecting locomotion, social interaction and spatial working memory, the open‑field, social interaction and Morris water maze tests were conducted.
  • MK‑801 injection for 14 days induced schizophrenia‑like behavioral abnormalities with decreased expression of the NMDA receptor and BDNF in the brains of mice.
  • The results indicated that free access to voluntary wheel running for 2 weeks alleviated schizophrenia‑like behavioral abnormalities and increased the expression of NMDA receptor and BDNF, comparable to the effects of aripiprazole treatment.
  • In the present study, the results suggest that NMDA receptor hypofunctioning induced schizophrenia‑like behaviors, and that voluntary wheel running was effective in reducing these symptoms by increasing NMDA receptor and BDNF expression, resulting in an improvement of disease related behavioral deficits.

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  • (PMID = 25323073.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-3004
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular medicine reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Med Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
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28. Smith AP, Chaplin K, Wadsworth E: Chewing gum, occupational stress, work performance and wellbeing. An intervention study. Appetite; 2012 Jun;58(3):1083-6
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  • [Title] Chewing gum, occupational stress, work performance and wellbeing. An intervention study.
  • The results showed that chewing gum reduced stress (both at work and outside work), reduced fatigue, reduced anxiety and depression and led to a more positive mood.
  • Chewing gum was also associated with perceptions of better performance (both at work and outside).
  • [MeSH-major] Affect. Chewing Gum. Fatigue / therapy. Mastication. Occupational Diseases / therapy. Stress, Psychological / therapy. Work

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 22390954.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8304
  • [Journal-full-title] Appetite
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appetite
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Chewing Gum
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29. Knekt P, Lindfors O, Laaksonen MA, Raitasalo R, Haaramo P, Järvikoski A, Helsinki Psychotherapy Study Group: Effectiveness of short-term and long-term psychotherapy on work ability and functional capacity--a randomized clinical trial on depressive and anxiety disorders. J Affect Disord; 2008 Apr;107(1-3):95-106
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  • [Title] Effectiveness of short-term and long-term psychotherapy on work ability and functional capacity--a randomized clinical trial on depressive and anxiety disorders.
  • BACKGROUND: Insufficient evidence exists about the effect of different therapies on work ability for patients with psychiatric disorders.
  • The present study compares improvements in work ability in two short-term therapies and one long-term therapy.
  • Primary outcome measures were the Work Ability Index (WAI), the Work-subscale (SAS-Work) of the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS-SR), Perceived Psychological Functioning Scale, the prevalence of patients employed or studying, and the number of sick-leave days.
  • RESULTS: Work ability was statistically significantly improved according to WAI (15%), SAS-Work (17%), and Perceived Psychological Functioning Scale (21%) during the 3-year follow-up.
  • No differences in the work ability scores were found between two short-term therapies.
  • The short-term therapies showed 4-11% more improved work ability scores than long-term therapy at the 7 month follow-up point.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Short-term therapies give benefits more quickly than long-term therapy on work ability but in the long run long-term therapy is more effective than short-term therapies.
  • [MeSH-major] Anxiety Disorders / therapy. Depressive Disorder / therapy. Psychotherapy / methods. Work / psychology. Work Capacity Evaluation
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Ambulatory Care. Employment / statistics & numerical data. Female. Finland. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Patient Dropouts. Psychotherapy, Brief / methods. Self-Evaluation Programs. Sick Leave / statistics & numerical data. Social Adjustment. Treatment Outcome

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  • [CommentIn] Evid Based Ment Health. 2008 Nov;11(4):109 [18952958.001]
  • (PMID = 17804079.001).
  • [ISSN] 0165-0327
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of affective disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Affect Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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30. Cocker F, Martin A, Scott J, Venn A, Otahal P, Sanderson K: Factors associated with presenteeism among employed Australian adults reporting lifetime major depression with 12-month symptoms. J Affect Disord; 2011 Dec;135(1-3):231-40
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  • [Title] Factors associated with presenteeism among employed Australian adults reporting lifetime major depression with 12-month symptoms.
  • BACKGROUND: Employees experiencing depression can take a sickness absence or continue working ('presenteeism').
  • This study aimed to determine the relative importance of socio-demographic, financial, work and health-related factors associated with presenteeism.
  • METHODS: The 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing provided data from employed individuals reporting lifetime major depression with 12-month symptoms (N=320).
  • Survey adjusted multivariable logistic regression assessed classification of 12-month, depression-related presenteeism on the basis of socio-demographic, financial, work and health factors.
  • Adding work factors (work hours and occupation type) produced a 1% increase in successfully classified cases (63%).
  • LIMITATIONS: Work-related variables were restricted to available measures.
  • Potentially important psychosocial work environment factors were unavailable.
  • Future research should explore the relative importance of psychosocial work environment and personality factors such as work demands, effort/reward imbalance and conscientiousness.
  • The identified associations between socio-demographic, financial and health factors on work attendance behaviors could inform disease management guidelines for employers via recognition of employees at risk of presenteeism.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Australia. Comorbidity. Cross-Sectional Studies. Depression. Depressive Disorder / epidemiology. Depressive Disorder / psychology. Female. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Mental Disorders / epidemiology. Mental Disorders / psychology. Mental Health. Middle Aged. Work. Workplace / psychology. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21880374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-2517
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of affective disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Affect Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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31. Brodsky CM: Suicide attributed to work. Suicide Life Threat Behav; 1977;7(4):216-29
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  • [Title] Suicide attributed to work.
  • Workers' compensation laws provide death benefits for the survivors of those who commit suicide as a result of a work-incurred physical or psychological injury.
  • A study of claims resulting from suicidal acts reveals that included in the indicted work conditions were sudden changes in organization, conflict of loyalties resulting from work change, reactions to pain and suffering following a physical work injury, and the economic and status deprivation resulting from disability and unemployment.
  • [MeSH-major] Suicide. Work

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  • (PMID = 148757.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-0234
  • [Journal-full-title] Suicide & life-threatening behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Suicide Life Threat Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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32. Hansen SL, Darling CA: Attitudes of adolescents toward division of labor in the home. Adolescence; 1985;20(77):61-72
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  • [Title] Attitudes of adolescents toward division of labor in the home.
  • A statewide study of adolescents' attitudes toward division of labor in the home was conducted to determine if adolescents are becoming more egalitarian in their approach to sex roles.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude. Gender Identity. Identification (Psychology). Work

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  • (PMID = 3984815.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-8449
  • [Journal-full-title] Adolescence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adolescence
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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33. Schauenburg H, Leiendecker C, Simon R, Küchenhoff J, Franz M: [Work in progress--why evidence-based guidelines do not mean the end of controversial discussions]. Z Psychosom Med Psychother; 2010;56(4):343-7
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  • [Title] [Work in progress--why evidence-based guidelines do not mean the end of controversial discussions].
  • [Transliterated title] Leitlinien als "work in progress" - warum Evidenzbasierung nicht den Verzicht auf kontroverse Diskussionen bedeutet.

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  • [CommentOn] Z Psychosom Med Psychother. 2010;56(4):334-42 [21243603.001]
  • (PMID = 21243604.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-3608
  • [Journal-full-title] Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Z Psychosom Med Psychother
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comment; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidepressive Agents
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34. Wynne-Jones G, Dunn KM, Main CJ: The impact of low back pain on work: a study in primary care consulters. Eur J Pain; 2008 Feb;12(2):180-8
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  • [Title] The impact of low back pain on work: a study in primary care consulters.
  • Economic analysis of LBP has focused on work absence among the employed.
  • Significant differences at baseline in socioeconomic status, self-rated health, anxiety, depression and disability were found between those undertaking their usual job, those on reduced duties and those on sickness absence due to LBP, with those participants further removed from the work force reporting worse health across all measures.
  • Significant differences were also found in self-rated health between those not working due to LBP and those not working for other reasons, with participants not working due to LBP reporting worse self-rated health.
  • At follow-up, work status was found to be relatively stable.
  • CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the economic impact of LBP may be higher than previously estimated when data on reduced duties is combined with work absence.
  • [MeSH-major] Low Back Pain / physiopathology. Low Back Pain / psychology. Primary Health Care. Work

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  • (PMID = 17561421.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2149
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pain (London, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Pain
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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35. Zhou M, Wege N, Gu H, Shang L, Li J, Siegrist J: Work and family stress is associated with menstrual disorders but not with fibrocystic changes: cross-sectional findings in Chinese working women. J Occup Health; 2010;52(6):361-6
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  • [Title] Work and family stress is associated with menstrual disorders but not with fibrocystic changes: cross-sectional findings in Chinese working women.
  • OBJECTIVES: To explore the separate and combined effects of work and family stress on menstrual disorders and fibrocystic changes in Chinese working women.
  • The Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire and Family Stress Scale were used to measure work stress and family stress, respectively; the menstrual and breast conditions were evaluated by gynecologic interview and a medical examination.
  • The risk of menstrual disorders was significantly elevated with respect to work and family stress.
  • The highest risk was found in the group with combined exposure to both work and family stress (RR with 95% CI 1.33 (1.18-1.49)).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Menstrual disorders were associated with stress from work and family life, but not fibrocystic changes, in working women.
  • Tailored intervention measures reducing the burden of stressful psychosocial work and family environment are needed to improve women's reproductive well-being.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyst Fluid. Employment / psychology. Family Relations. Fibrocystic Breast Disease / psychology. Menstruation Disturbances / psychology. Stress, Psychological / complications. Women, Working / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. China / epidemiology. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Logistic Models. Middle Aged. Questionnaires. Railroads. Risk Factors. Work / psychology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20944439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1348-9585
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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36. Pugliesi K: Employment characteristics, social support and the well-being of women. Women Health; 1988;14(1):35-58
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  • Two aspects of the nature of work are examined, autonomy and complexity.
  • Results indicate that both dimensions of employment characteristics have positive effects on social support.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Marriage. Middle Aged. Regression Analysis. Self Concept. Social Facilitation. Stress, Psychological. Work

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  • (PMID = 3232391.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-0242
  • [Journal-full-title] Women & health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Women Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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37. Sperlich S, Arnhold-Kerri S, Siegrist J, Geyer S: The mismatch between high effort and low reward in household and family work predicts impaired health among mothers. Eur J Public Health; 2013 Oct;23(5):893-8
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  • [Title] The mismatch between high effort and low reward in household and family work predicts impaired health among mothers.
  • This article reports results on a newly developed questionnaire measuring ERI in unpaid household and family work.
  • METHODS: Using data of a population-based sample of 3129 German mothers, logistic regression analyses were performed to test the following three main assumptions: (i) high effort combined with low reward in household and family work increases the risk of poor health;.
  • Thus, we conclude that ERI is applicable to domestic work and may provide an explanatory framework to assess stress experiences in mothers.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Status. Mothers / psychology. Reward. Stress, Psychological / etiology. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 23002240.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-360X
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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38. Marková IS, Berrios GE: Epistemology of mental symptoms. Psychopathology; 2009;42(6):343-9
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  • [Title] Epistemology of mental symptoms.
  • BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Psychiatric diagnosis is dependent on the identification of mental symptoms.
  • Published work on the philosophy of psychiatry has tended to concentrate on the concept of mental disorder or on individual symptoms but has given less attention to mental symptoms as a class.
  • This paper deals specifically with the epistemology of mental symptoms, that is, with focusing on the nature of mental symptoms as a class of 'objects' and how the clinician gets to know them.
  • In order to do this, mental symptoms can be explored from various perspectives, namely: (i) as types of objects, (ii) as structures, (iii) as definitions, (iv) as pockets of meanings, (v) as comprising constituents, (vi) as attractors in specific dialogical contexts, etc.
  • RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Our analysis shows mental symptoms to be unstable constructs with implications for both correlational research and further theoretical exploration.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms / diagnosis. Mental Disorders / diagnosis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 19752587.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-033X
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Number-of-references] 23
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39. Zoupanou Z, Cropley M, Rydstedt LW: Recovery after work: the role of work beliefs in the unwinding process. PLoS One; 2013;8(12):e81381
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  • [Title] Recovery after work: the role of work beliefs in the unwinding process.
  • According to the Effort-Recovery model, mental or physical detachment from work is an important mechanism of work related recovery, as delayed recovery has been associated with range of negative health symptoms.
  • In this paper, we examine whether recovery from work (in the form of mentally disengagement from work) is affected by the concept of 'work ethic', which refers to beliefs workers hold about their work and leisure and the effects of experiencing interruptions at work.
  • Two indices of post-work recovery were utilized: problem solving pondering and psychological detachment.
  • Main effects of positive and negative appraisal of work interruption and beliefs were analysed using mediated and moderated regression analysis on problem-solving pondering and detachment.
  • Weakened belief in wasted time as a partial mediator, reduced problem-solving pondering post work when interruptions were appraised as positive, and a high evaluation of leisure partially mediated problem-solving pondering when interruptions were appraised as positive.
  • The results also showed that a high evaluation of centrality of work and leisure moderated the effect of negative appraisal of work interruption on elevated problem-solving pondering.
  • Positive appraisal of work interruption was related to problem-solving pondering, and the strength of this association was further moderated by a strong belief in delay of gratification.
  • In addition, employees' positive appraisal of work interruption was related to work detachment, and the strength of this association was further moderated by strong beliefs in hard work and self-reliance.
  • These findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications for employees who are strongly influenced by such work beliefs.
  • [MeSH-major] Work / psychology

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  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3862850
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40. Ganasegeran K, Perianayagam W, Nagaraj P, Al-Dubai SA: Psycho-behavioural risks of low back pain in railway workers. Occup Med (Lond); 2014 Jul;64(5):372-5
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  • BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is the most costly ailment in the work force.
  • Risky work behaviour and psychological stress are established risk factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Low Back Pain / etiology. Occupational Diseases / etiology. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Railroads. Stress, Mechanical. Stress, Psychological / complications. Work

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  • [Copyright] © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
  • (PMID = 24727561.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-8405
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational medicine (Oxford, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Med (Lond)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Epidemiology / low back pain / musculoskeletal / psychological stress / railway workers / workplace risk factors.
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41. Løvvik C, Øverland S, Hysing M, Broadbent E, Reme SE: Association between illness perceptions and return-to-work expectations in workers with common mental health symptoms. J Occup Rehabil; 2014 Mar;24(1):160-70
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  • [Title] Association between illness perceptions and return-to-work expectations in workers with common mental health symptoms.
  • PURPOSE: Mental health symptoms (MHSs) may affect people's work capacity and lead to sickness absence and disability.
  • Expectations and perceptions of illness have been shown to influence return to work (RTW) across health conditions, but we know little about illness perceptions and RTW-expectations in MHSs.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the association between illness perceptions and RTW-expectations in a group struggling with work participation due to MHSs.
  • METHODS: Cross-sectional associations between illness perceptions and return to work expectations at baseline were analyzed for 1,193 participants who reported that MHSs affected their work participation.
  • The study was part of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of job focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) combined with supported employment (IPS).
  • Participants were from a working age population with diverse job status.
  • Openly asked, participants reported work, personal relationships and stress as main causes of their illness.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In people with MHSs who struggle with work participation, perceptions and beliefs about their problems are strongly associated with their expectations to return to work.
  • [MeSH-major] Employment / psychology. Mental Disorders / psychology. Return to Work. Work

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  • (PMID = 23595310.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3688
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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42. Abma FI, Amick BC 3rd, van der Klink JJ, Bültmann U: Prognostic factors for successful work functioning in the general working population. J Occup Rehabil; 2013 Jun;23(2):162-9
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  • [Title] Prognostic factors for successful work functioning in the general working population.
  • PURPOSE: To help workers to stay at work in a healthy productive and sustainable way and for the development of interventions to improve work functioning, it is important to have insight in prognostic factors for successful work functioning.
  • The aim of this study is to identify prognostic factors for successful work functioning in a general working population.
  • METHODS: A longitudinal study (3 months follow-up) was conducted among the working population (N = 98).
  • Work functioning was assessed with the Work Role Functioning Questionnaire 2.0 (WRFQ).
  • The total score was categorized as follows: 0-90; >90 ≤95; and >95-100 (defined as 'successful work functioning').
  • Ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to examine bivariate relationships between potential prognostic factors and the dependent variable (successful work functioning) to identify potential prognostic factors for the multivariate models (p < 0.10).
  • RESULTS: Baseline work functioning and work ability were significant prognostic factors for successful work functioning at 3 months follow-up.
  • No prospective associations were identified for psychological job demands and supervisor social support with successful work functioning.
  • CONCLUSION: To our knowledge this is the first longitudinal study to identify prognostic factors for successful work functioning in the general working population.
  • High work ability is predictive for future successful work functioning, independent of baseline work functioning.
  • [MeSH-major] Work. Work Capacity Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 23247639.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3688
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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43. Nomura K, Nakao M, Tsurugano S, Takeuchi T, Inoue M, Shinozaki Y, Yano E: Job stress and healthy behavior among male Japanese office workers. Am J Ind Med; 2010 Nov;53(11):1128-34
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  • Multivariate logistic model showed that healthy behaviors were positively associated with a higher degree of work control and negatively associated with greater work demand.
  • Work control and support were negatively correlated with tension-anxiety and depression, whereas work demand and strain were positively correlated with these two emotion domains (all P's < 0.0001).
  • [MeSH-major] Health Behavior. Occupational Diseases / psychology. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Work / psychology

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  • [Copyright] © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 20957727.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0274
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of industrial medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Ind. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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44. Fisher GG, Bulger CA, Smith CS: Beyond work and family: a measure of work/nonwork interference and enhancement. J Occup Health Psychol; 2009 Oct;14(4):441-56
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  • [Title] Beyond work and family: a measure of work/nonwork interference and enhancement.
  • Though early research on the work/nonwork interface was broader in scope, most recent research has focused on the interface between work and family.
  • There is a need for an inclusive, validated measure of work/nonwork interference and enhancement that is appropriate for all workers regardless of their marital or family life status.
  • The authors report here on 3 studies in which they develop a theoretically grounded and empirically validated multidimensional, bidirectional measure of work/nonwork interference and enhancement.
  • All scale items refer to work/nonwork, whereas previous measures have mixed work/family and work/nonwork items or emphasize family roles in the nonwork domain.
  • Quantitative analysis of the scale items yielded 17 items to measure work interference with personal life, personal life interference with work, work enhancement of personal life, and personal life enhancement of work.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Conflict (Psychology). Data Collection. Female. Humans. Job Satisfaction. Male. Middle Aged. New England / epidemiology. Stress, Psychological / epidemiology. Work Schedule Tolerance. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 19839663.001).
  • [ISSN] 1939-1307
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational health psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Health Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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45. Gignac MA, Lacaille D, Beaton DE, Backman CL, Cao X, Badley EM: Striking a balance: work-health-personal life conflict in women and men with arthritis and its association with work outcomes. J Occup Rehabil; 2014 Sep;24(3):573-84
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  • [Title] Striking a balance: work-health-personal life conflict in women and men with arthritis and its association with work outcomes.
  • PURPOSE: To examine men and women's perceptions of inter-role balance/imbalance in work, arthritis, and personal roles and its association with demographic, health and employment factors, including job stress, career satisfaction, job disruptions, absenteeism and perceived productivity losses.
  • Respondents completed a 35-45 min telephone interview and a 20-min self-administered questionnaire assessing role perceptions [(arthritis negatively impacts work (A → W); work/personal life negatively impact arthritis (W/P → A); work as a positive role (W +))], demographic, health and work context information.
  • RESULTS: Findings revealed similarities between men (n = 104) and women (n = 248) in health, work and role perceptions, although women reported more benefits of working with arthritis (W+) than men.
  • Some gender differences were found in factors associated with inter-role perceptions highlighting the importance of children, fatigue, unpredictable work hours, job control, and workplace activity limitations.
  • Role perceptions were associated with work outcomes but only one perception, W/P → A, interacted with gender.
  • Among men, greater perceptions that work and personal demands interfered with managing arthritis were associated with more job disruptions.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed negative and positive inter-role perceptions related to working with a chronic illness and associations with work outcomes.
  • It highlights potentially modifiable factors that could assess risk and inform interventions to improve role balance and working experiences.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. British Columbia / epidemiology. Conflict (Psychology). Fatigue / epidemiology. Fatigue / psychology. Female. Humans. Internal-External Control. Job Satisfaction. Male. Middle Aged. Ontario / epidemiology. Personnel Staffing and Scheduling. Questionnaires. Role. Sex Factors. Stress, Psychological / epidemiology. Work Schedule Tolerance / physiology. Work Schedule Tolerance / psychology

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  • (PMID = 24370635.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3688
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / FRN 106589
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4118040
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46. Lhuilier D: [Suicide and work]. Rev Prat; 2011 Feb;61(2):198-201
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  • [Title] [Suicide and work].
  • [Transliterated title] Suicide et travail.
  • Causes of suicidal gesture are subject to recurrent controversies.
  • Contradictory theories (structuralist theories vs sociogenetic theories) should be overcome to explore relationships between subjects and their work environment.
  • Most of the time, subjects share two features: loneliness and loss of acting power.

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  • (PMID = 21618768.001).
  • [ISSN] 0035-2640
  • [Journal-full-title] La Revue du praticien
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Prat
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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47. Barbini N, Gorini G, Ferrucci L, Biggeri A: [Analysis of arterial hypertension and work in the epidemiologic study "Aging, Health and Work"]. Epidemiol Prev; 2005 May-Aug;29(3-4):160-5
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  • [Title] [Analysis of arterial hypertension and work in the epidemiologic study "Aging, Health and Work"].
  • [Transliterated title] Analisi sull'ipertensione arteriosa e il lavoro nello studio epidemiologico "Invecchiamento, salute e lavoro."
  • OBJECTIVE: We evaluated if work conditions or job strain related to professional activity or to life styles represent a risk factor for arterial hypertension and whether this effect of hypertension is independent of age.
  • DESIGN: through data collection of epidemiological inquiries ESTEV and VISAT, applied in Italy on a cohort of workers, 32-52 year-old, employed in different productive sectors, we analyzed the relationships on working conditions (exposure to certain risks or job strain), life styles and self evaluation of health and arterial hypertension.
  • Risk estimation in multivariate analysis, by logistic regression model, showed a statistically significant association with certain work-related factors such as: shift work, awkward posture, standing work, doing several tasks contemporarily, being interrupted at work, not being able to take eyes off work.
  • The variables referred to cognitive aspects and work organization tended to be associated to arterial hypertension even when exposure ceased.
  • CONCLUSIONS: both physical and cognitive organisational aspects of work are strongly associated with arterial hypertension.
  • The subjective assessment that workers give to their work is a relevant element.
  • [MeSH-major] Aging. Hypertension / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Distribution. Age Factors. Cohort Studies. Female. Health Status. Humans. Italy / epidemiology. Life Style. Male. Middle Aged. Prevalence. Questionnaires. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution. Stress, Psychological / complications. Stress, Psychological / etiology. Work Schedule Tolerance. Workload


48. Wittchen HU, Fuetsch M, Sonntag H, Müller N, Liebowitz M: Disability and quality of life in pure and comorbid social phobia. Findings from a controlled study. Eur Psychiatry; 2000 Feb;15(1):46-58
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  • (b) work productivity; and, (c) various other disorder-specific social impairments in current cases with pure (n = 65), comorbid (n = 51) and subthreshold (n = 34) DSM-IV social phobia as compared to controls with no social phobia (subjects with a history of herpes infections).
  • Past-week work productivity of social phobics was significantly diminished as indicated by: (a) a three-fold higher rate of unemployed cases;.
  • (b) elevated rates of work hours missed due to social phobia problems; and (c) a reduced work performance.
  • Overall, these findings underline that social phobia in our sample of adults, whether comorbid, subthreshold, or pure was a persisting and impairing condition, resulting in considerable subjective suffering and negative impact on work performance and social relationships.
  • [MeSH-major] Mental Disorders / epidemiology. Mental Disorders / psychology. Phobic Disorders / epidemiology. Phobic Disorders / psychology. Quality of Life. Work

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  • (PMID = 10713802.001).
  • [ISSN] 0924-9338
  • [Journal-full-title] European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
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49. Ndjaboué R, Brisson C, Vézina M, Blanchette C, Bourbonnais R: Effort--reward imbalance and medically certified absence for mental health problems: a prospective study of white-collar workers. Occup Environ Med; 2014 Jan;71(1):40-7
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  • OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the effects of psychosocial work factors on objectively assessed mental health problems leading to medically certified absence.
  • Only one study has evaluated the prospective effects of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work with regards to this outcome.
  • Medical absences from work were collected from employers' files and psychosocial factors were measured using the ERI questionnaire.
  • Effort at work had no effect on certified absence.
  • CONCLUSIONS: ERI and low reward at work were prospectively associated with medically certified absence for mental health problems.
  • [MeSH-major] Job Satisfaction. Mental Disorders. Reward. Sick Leave. Stress, Psychological. Work / psychology. Workload / psychology

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  • (PMID = 24174636.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7926
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / / GIR-91062; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / R01OH007647-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
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50. Griffiths KL, Mackey MG, Adamson BJ: Behavioral and psychophysiological responses to job demands and association with musculoskeletal symptoms in computer work. J Occup Rehabil; 2011 Dec;21(4):482-92
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  • [Title] Behavioral and psychophysiological responses to job demands and association with musculoskeletal symptoms in computer work.
  • INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to identify and compare individual behavioral and psychophysiological responses to workload demands and stressors associated with the reporting of musculoskeletal symptoms with computer work.
  • Evidence is growing that the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms increases with longer hours of computer work and exposure to psychosocial stressors such as high workloads and unrealistic deadlines.
  • Workstyle, or how an individual worker behaves in response to such work demands, may also be an important factor associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in computer operators.
  • METHOD: Approximately 8,000 employees of the Australian Public Service were invited to complete an on-line survey if they worked with a computer for 15 or more hours per week.
  • The survey was a composite of three questionnaires: the ASSET to measure perceived organizational stressors, Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to measure reported prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and additional questions to measure individual work behaviors and responses.
  • Logistic regression was used to identify significant behavioral and work response predictors of musculoskeletal symptoms.
  • Reporting of heightened muscle tension in response to workload pressure was more strongly associated, than other physical behavioral factors, with musculoskeletal symptoms for all body areas, particularly the neck (OR = 2.50, 95% CI: 2.09-2.99).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Individual workstyles in response to workload demands and stressors, including working with heightened muscle tension and mental fatigue, were significantly associated with musculoskeletal symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 21327727.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3688
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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51. Cabral CA: [Work psychopathology]. Acta Psiquiatr Psicol Am Lat; 1988 Sep;34(3):237-42
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  • [Title] [Work psychopathology].
  • [Transliterated title] Psicopatología del trabajo.
  • Work psychopathology concept is outlined, restricted, however, to different disorders and conflicts whose actual cause is to be found in the intrinsic mechanism of work-related activity.
  • Nervous fatigue neurasthenoid syndrome is understood as a result of a dephasing between CNS neurophysiological timing and work rhythms.
  • Ergonomy is to be developed: Ergonomy is an interdisciplinary science which studies concordance between Man's physical and psychophysiological possibilities and properties, and possibilities and properties of contemporary work technical systems and their functioning conditions as well.
  • [MeSH-major] Mental Fatigue / etiology. Neurasthenia / etiology. Occupational Diseases / psychology. Psychophysiologic Disorders / etiology. Work

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  • (PMID = 2907230.001).
  • [ISSN] 0001-6896
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta psiquiátrica y psicológica de América latina
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Psiquiatr Psicol Am Lat
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ARGENTINA
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52. Söderman E, Lisspers J, Sundin O: Depression as a predictor of return to work in patients with coronary artery disease. Soc Sci Med; 2003 Jan;56(1):193-202
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  • [Title] Depression as a predictor of return to work in patients with coronary artery disease.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the power of depression as a predictor of return to work, both at full time and at reduced working hours, within 12 months of participation in a behaviorally oriented rehabilitation program in Sweden.
  • The results showed that clinical depression before intervention (>or=16 as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory) exerted a great influence on work resumption both at full-time (odds ratio 9.43, CI=3.15-28.21) and at reduced working-hours (odds ratio 5.44, CI=1.60-18.53), while mild depression (BDI 10-15) influenced only work resumption at full-time (odds ratio 2.89, CI=1.08-7.70).
  • Education and, at full-time hours, age also predicted work resumption.
  • This highlights the importance of depressive symptoms in relation to return to work after a CAD event.
  • More research is needed in order to elaborate the degree to which treatment of depression enhances work resumption rates.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary / rehabilitation. Coronary Artery Bypass / rehabilitation. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Models, Statistical. Myocardial Infarction / psychology. Myocardial Infarction / rehabilitation. Myocardial Infarction / surgery. Odds Ratio. Personality Assessment. Sick Leave. Sweden / epidemiology. Type A Personality. Work / psychology. Work / statistics & numerical data


53. Falco A, Girardi D, Kravina L, Trifiletti E, Bartolucci GB, Capozza D, De Carlo NA: The mediating role of psychophysic strain in the relationship between workaholism, job performance, and sickness absence: a longitudinal study. J Occup Environ Med; 2013 Nov;55(11):1255-61
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  • The study was articulated into two phases, over a time period of 15 months.
  • Workaholism was assessed using a self-report measure (time 1).
  • Psychophysic strain was measured by the occupational physician, performance by the supervisor, and data on sickness absences were collected from the company's database (time 2).
  • This is associated with lower working performance and greater sickness absences.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavior, Addictive / psychology. Sick Leave. Stress, Physiological. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Task Performance and Analysis. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 24202241.001).
  • [ISSN] 1536-5948
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Occup. Environ. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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54. Font A, Moncada S, Benavides FG: The relationship between immigration and mental health: what is the role of workplace psychosocial factors. Int Arch Occup Environ Health; 2012 Oct;85(7):801-6
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  • The prevalence ratio (PR) and confidence intervals (CI 95%) were estimated from crude data and from data adjusted for sex, age, and occupational category.
  • RESULTS: Immigrants who experienced high quantitative demands (PR = 1.46; CI 95%:1.34-1.59), high emotional demands (PR = 1.42; CI 95%:1.301.56), high demands for hiding emotions (PR = 1.35; CI 95%:1.21-1.50), low possibilities for development (PR = 1.21; CI 95%:1.09-1.33), low levels of support from coworkers (PR = 1.41; CI 95%:1.30-1.53), and low esteem (PR = 1.53; CI 95%:1.42-1.66) perceived worse mental health.
  • Equally, the study found that the immigrants with a high influence (PR = 1.19; CI 95%:1.09-1.29) and high control over working times (PR = 1.25; CI 95%:1.14-1.36) also reported worse mental health.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Occupational Diseases / psychology. Psychology. Questionnaires. Social Behavior. Work. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 22138841.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1246
  • [Journal-full-title] International archives of occupational and environmental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Arch Occup Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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55. Katz VL: Work and work-related stress in pregnancy. Clin Obstet Gynecol; 2012 Sep;55(3):765-73
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  • [Title] Work and work-related stress in pregnancy.
  • Work, in general, does not increase the risks of pregnancy complications.
  • Work that is stressful, physically, psychologically, or both, has deleterious effects on pregnancy.
  • Stressful work increases the risks of miscarriage, preterm labor, preterm birth, low birth weight, and preeclampsia.
  • Women with a history of pregnancy complications should be counseled about reducing stressful work before pregnancy.
  • Women with stressful jobs should be followed closely during pregnancy, and if signs of preterm labor or delayed fetal growth develop, then occupational stress should be decreased or eliminated.
  • A careful work history should be part of every preconception and early pregnancy visit.
  • [MeSH-major] Pregnancy / psychology. Pregnancy Complications / psychology. Stress, Psychological. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Abortion, Spontaneous. Female. Humans. Infant, Low Birth Weight. Infant, Newborn. Obstetric Labor, Premature. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects. Premature Birth. Risk Factors. Teratogens


56. Schellekens JM, Sijtsma GJ, Vegter E, Meijman TF: Immediate and delayed after-effects of long lasting mentally demanding work. Biol Psychol; 2000 May;53(1):37-56
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  • [Title] Immediate and delayed after-effects of long lasting mentally demanding work.
  • This study investigates the hypothesis that long lasting mental work demands are reflected in after-effects on attention demanding post-test probe tasks.
  • Performance measures were reaction time and errors; effort was indicated by heart rate variability in the 0.07-0.
  • Moreover, at that time they felt more fatigued and deactivated as indicated by the results of the 'Scale of Experienced Load' (SEB) (fatigue) and 'Groninger Adjective Checklist' (GACL) (mood) questionnaires.
  • The repeated measurement of the relation of performance, effort and feelings reveals the dynamics of the pattern of fatigue after-effects over the (recovery) time.
  • [MeSH-major] Fatigue. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Affect. Circadian Rhythm. Epinephrine / urine. Female. Heart Rate / physiology. Humans. Hydrocortisone / urine. Male. Memory / physiology. Questionnaires. Reaction Time. Stress, Psychological. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 10876064.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-0511
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone; YKH834O4BH / Epinephrine
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57. Bethge M, Radoschewski FM, Müller-Fahrnow W: Work stress and work ability: cross-sectional findings from the German sociomedical panel of employees. Disabil Rehabil; 2009;31(20):1692-9
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  • [Title] Work stress and work ability: cross-sectional findings from the German sociomedical panel of employees.
  • PURPOSE: Maintenance of work ability and restoration of reduced work ability by prevention and rehabilitation are major aims of disability management.
  • To achieve these aims, decision-makers and health care providers need evidence of the determinants of restricted work ability.
  • The aim of this article was to analyse the cross-sectional association between work stress and work ability in a population drawn from a random sample of employees.
  • METHODS: A total of 1463 working men and women aged 30-59 years from the baseline survey of the German SPE were included in the analyses.
  • Work stress was defined in terms of the demand-control model and the effort-reward (ER) imbalance model.
  • Work ability was assessed by the Work Ability Index (WAI).
  • We used multiple imputations to account for missing data and calculated logistic regression models to estimate associations between the two work stress models and restrictions of work ability.
  • RESULTS: Approximately one third (32.0%) of the respondents reported restrictions of work ability (WAI <37) indicating a need of interventions to improve and to restore work ability.
  • Restrictions of work ability were explained independently by high job strain due to high demand and low control (OR = 4.66; 95% CI = [2.93, 7.42]) and by effort-reward imbalance (OR = 2.88; 95% CI = [1.95, 4.25]).
  • CONCLUSION: Work stress is associated with restrictions of work ability, but longitudinal analyses are required to confirm a causal relation.
  • [MeSH-major] Stress, Psychological / epidemiology. Work

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  • (PMID = 19479539.001).
  • [ISSN] 0963-8288
  • [Journal-full-title] Disability and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Disabil Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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58. Virtanen M, Kivimäki M, Singh-Manoux A, Gimeno D, Shipley MJ, Vahtera J, Akbaraly TN, Marmot MG, Ferrie JE: Work disability following major organisational change: the Whitehall II study. J Epidemiol Community Health; 2010 May;64(5):461-4
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  • [Title] Work disability following major organisational change: the Whitehall II study.
  • Over the same period, long-term work disability has risen substantially.
  • We examined whether a major organisational change--the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines--was associated with an increased risk of work disability.
  • Associations between transfer to an executive agency assessed at baseline (1991-1994) and work disability ascertained over a period of approximately 8 years at three follow-up surveys (1995-1996, 1997-1999 and 2001) were examined using Cox proportional hazard models.
  • RESULTS: In age- and sex-adjusted models, risk of work disability was higher among the 1263 employees who were transferred to an executive agency (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.46 to 2.48) compared with the 3419 employees whose job was not transferred.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Increased work disability was observed among employees exposed to the transfer of public sector work to executive agencies run on private sector lines.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administrative Personnel / organization & administration. Adult. Cohort Studies. Female. Finland / epidemiology. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective Studies. Public Sector. Stress, Psychological / epidemiology. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Work Schedule Tolerance

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  • [Cites] Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1999 Oct;34(10):533-40 [10591813.001]
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  • (PMID = 20445214.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-2738
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of epidemiology and community health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Epidemiol Community Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / AG13196; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0100222; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G0902037; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G19/35; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / G8802774; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL36310; United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / HS06516; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG013196; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL036310; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL036310-20A2; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01AG013196; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01AG034454; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01HL036310-20A2; United Kingdom / British Heart Foundation / / RG/07/008/23674; United Kingdom / British Heart Foundation / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ HALMS482676; NLM/ PMC2997797
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59. Amiel R: [Chronogenesis, psychorhythms and work]. Ann Med Psychol (Paris); 1988 May-Jun;146(7):633-6
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  • [Title] [Chronogenesis, psychorhythms and work].
  • [Transliterated title] Chronogenèse, psychorythmes et travail.
  • Working is man's wealth.
  • His work has shaped the world as it is.
  • But modern work, technology, artificial light, after splitting up tasks, threaten the "synchronous" progress of days and seasons.
  • Working time is more and more reduced, moved forward or back, sensorially isolated, socially "sterilized", with high production rates etc...
  • Thus, the usual forms of working time organization, with their arbitrary divisions, the monotony, repetitiveness and other restricting factors (stress), not only do not contribute to self-realization, but create rancor, boredom and drama.
  • Man's time is not only the time of the clocks, il is also experience, anticipation, memory.
  • Prevention supposes some other time, with more freedom, to favour self-realization.
  • One of the first tasks of tomorrow's medicine will be to reconcile working and non-working time.
  • [MeSH-major] Burnout, Professional / psychology. Chronobiology Phenomena. Human Engineering. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Work

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  • (PMID = 3223684.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4487
  • [Journal-full-title] Annales médico-psychologiques
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Med Psychol (Paris)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] FRANCE
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60. Tett RP, Bobocel DR, Hafer C, Lees MC, Smith CA, Jackson DN: The dimensionality of Type A behavior within a stressful work simulation. J Pers; 1992 Sep;60(3):533-51
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  • [Title] The dimensionality of Type A behavior within a stressful work simulation.
  • The present study was conducted to examine the dimensionality of overt Type A behaviors elicited in a simulated stressful work environment.
  • University students played a managerial role while being subjected to time and work-load pressures, and completed the Survey of Work Styles (SWS; Jackson & Gray, 1989).
  • [MeSH-major] Type A Personality. Work

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  • (PMID = 1403595.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3506
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of personality
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pers
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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61. Finkel SI: Behavioral and psychologic symptoms of dementia. Clin Geriatr Med; 2003 Nov;19(4):799-824
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  • [Title] Behavioral and psychologic symptoms of dementia.
  • Although tremendous strides with regard to identification and treatment of BPSD have been made over the last several decades, much work remains.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms. Dementia / diagnosis

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  • (PMID = 15024813.001).
  • [ISSN] 0749-0690
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in geriatric medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Geriatr. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Psychotropic Drugs
  • [Number-of-references] 136
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62. Duijts SF, van Egmond MP, Spelten E, van Muijen P, Anema JR, van der Beek AJ: Physical and psychosocial problems in cancer survivors beyond return to work: a systematic review. Psychooncology; 2014 May;23(5):481-92
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  • [Title] Physical and psychosocial problems in cancer survivors beyond return to work: a systematic review.
  • OBJECTIVE: Attention for the expanding group of cancer survivors at work, and the late effects they are confronted with while working, has been limited.
  • The objective of this systematic review is to identify and summarize studies, exploring ongoing physical and/or psychosocial problems related to functioning of employees with a history of cancer, beyond their return to work.
  • Two reviewers independently extracted data from each publication, e.g., physical and/or psychosocial problems (e.g., fatigue and cognitive limitations), outcome measures (e.g., work productivity), and qualitative and quantitative results.
  • The majority of studies assessed psychosocial problems in cancer survivors at work.
  • Cognitive limitations, coping issues, fatigue, depression, and anxiety were reported to influence work ability.
  • Physical problems, such as difficulties with lifting and treatment-induced menopausal symptoms, were frequently described to affect functioning at work.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Ongoing physical and/or psychosocial problems are present in occupationally active cancer survivors, which may cause serious difficulties at work.
  • [MeSH-major] Fatigue. Neoplasms / psychology. Return to Work. Survivors / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Psychological. Anxiety / psychology. Depression / psychology. Employment. Humans. Quality of Life. Work

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 24375630.001).
  • [ISSN] 1099-1611
  • [Journal-full-title] Psycho-oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychooncology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; cancer / oncology / physical / psychosocial / review / work ability
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63. Sallis A, Birkin R: Experiences of work and sickness absence in employees with depression: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. J Occup Rehabil; 2014 Sep;24(3):469-83
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  • [Title] Experiences of work and sickness absence in employees with depression: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.
  • (1) the interaction between depression and work;.
  • The analysis revealed that participants appeared to hold five key perceptions about their depression and work: low control in the workplace; lack of line manager support; diminishing ability to work; the need to address depressive symptoms; and perceptions of depression.
  • The themes and participants' accounts of their work and sickness absence and return to work behaviour are discussed in relation to relevant theory and evidence to understand how these perceptions and beliefs mediate behaviour.
  • CONCLUSION: Individuals' health (illness representations) and work beliefs (outcome expectancies and self-efficacy for work tasks and management of health at work) appear to influence individuals' sickness absence decisions and experiences and these are mediated by individuals' experiences of organisational policies, line manager support and the messages and actions of GPs.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Attitude to Health. Female. Great Britain. Health Status. Humans. Interviews as Topic. Male. Middle Aged. Return to Work. Sampling Studies. Self Efficacy. Social Stigma

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  • (PMID = 24101349.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-3688
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Occup Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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64. Castillo JA, Cubillos AP: [Violence in the transformation of systems of work in Colombia]. Rev Salud Publica (Bogota); 2012 Jun;14 Suppl 1:84-97
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  • [Title] [Violence in the transformation of systems of work in Colombia].
  • [Transliterated title] La violencia en las transformaciones de los sistemas de trabajo en Colombia.
  • This work approaches initially the problem of the violence in general then to try to specify the problem of the work violence.
  • Today this one is a wide field of investigation nevertheless in Colombia even it remains to do efforts to understand this phenomenon in an environment of political and social violence, in the frame of which rapid transformations are happening in the forms of organization of the work.
  • Our method of work this one based on the accomplishment of semi-structured interviews with workers who have experienced some form of violence in the work.
  • [MeSH-major] Organizational Culture. Violence. Work

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  • (PMID = 23258749.001).
  • [ISSN] 0124-0064
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de salud pública (Bogotá, Colombia)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Salud Publica (Bogota)
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Colombia
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65. Kawakami N: [Improvement of work environment]. Sangyo Eiseigaku Zasshi; 2002 May;44(3):95-9
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  • [Title] [Improvement of work environment].
  • As a result of a literature review on methodology and the effectiveness of work-environment oriented workplace stress reduction, it is suggested that improvement of the work environment is effective in reducing workers' job stressors and psychological and physiological stress reaction, from a limited number of controlled studies including RCT, as well as a number of case studies and before-after comparison studies.
  • The author proposes five practical steps toward an effective improvement of the work environment based on the review.
  • [MeSH-major] Occupational Health. Stress, Psychological / prevention & control. Work

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  • (PMID = 12094706.001).
  • [ISSN] 1341-0725
  • [Journal-full-title] Sangyō eiseigaku zasshi = Journal of occupational health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sangyo Eiseigaku Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Number-of-references] 16
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66. Dincheva E, Tsaneva N, Simeonov G: [Analysis of a subjective assessment of work and morbidity in modern jobs]. Probl Khig; 1976;2:9-17
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  • [Title] [Analysis of a subjective assessment of work and morbidity in modern jobs].
  • An analysis is made of the subjective assessment of work and morbidity in individuals engaged in two groups of up-to-date occupations: a) with considerable, and b) with insignificant nervous strain.
  • Morbidity analysis is carried out on the basis of data from 1980 temporary disability cards--90 per cent of the workers exposed to a substantial neurosensory stress feel tired at the end of the working day.
  • [MeSH-major] Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Work

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  • (PMID = 1032726.001).
  • [ISSN] 0323-9179
  • [Journal-full-title] Problemi na khigienata
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Probl Khig
  • [Language] bul
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] BULGARIA
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67. Kumashiro M, Nagae S: [Workers' subjective feeling of fatigue and attitudes towards work--effects of age and job difference]. J UOEH; 1984 Sep 1;6(3):273-81
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  • [Title] [Workers' subjective feeling of fatigue and attitudes towards work--effects of age and job difference].
  • The present study is an attempt to assess attitudes towards work and subjective feelings of fatigue.
  • Finally, workers who had a high complaint rate of fatigue were less favourably disposed towards their work and felt an increase in boredom, loneliness and monotony.
  • Overall, the results indicated that the difference of labor mode exerts an influence on the onset of self-reported stress.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude. Fatigue. Work

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  • (PMID = 6149606.001).
  • [ISSN] 0387-821X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of UOEH
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. UOEH
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
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68. Anderson R: Stress at work: the current perspective. J R Soc Promot Health; 2003 Jun;123(2):81-7
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  • [Title] Stress at work: the current perspective.
  • Stress caused by work is costing UK organisations dearly.
  • Finally, it describes the latest guidelines for work-related stress which resulted from the Hatton v.
  • [MeSH-minor] Cost of Illness. Employer Health Costs. Great Britain / epidemiology. Guidelines as Topic. Humans. Organizational Culture. Organizational Innovation. Risk Assessment. Work Schedule Tolerance

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  • (PMID = 12852191.001).
  • [ISSN] 1466-4240
  • [Journal-full-title] The journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J R Soc Promot Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Legal Cases
  • [Publication-country] England
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69. Kelloway EK, Gottlieb BH: The effect of alternative work arrangements on women's well-being: a demand-control model. Womens Health; 1998;4(1):1-18
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  • [Title] The effect of alternative work arrangements on women's well-being: a demand-control model.
  • The growth of women's participation in the labor force and evidence of the conflict they experience between job and family demands have spurred many employers to introduce alternative work arrangements such as flextime, job sharing, and telecommuting.
  • Drawing on data gained from a sample of women (N = 998) in two large Canadian organizations, this study evaluates two mediational models of the impact of alternative work arrangements on women's stress and family role competence.
  • Specifically, it tests and finds support for the hypotheses that (a) work arrangements involving scheduling flexibility (telecommuting and flextime) promote these aspects of women's well-being by increasing their perceived control over their time, and (b) arrangements involving reduced hours of employment (part-time employment and job sharing) promote well-being by reducing perceived job overload.
  • [MeSH-major] Employment / organization & administration. Models, Psychological. Women, Working / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Canada. Data Interpretation, Statistical. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Family. Female. Humans. Stress, Psychological. Time Factors. Women's Health. Work Schedule Tolerance. Workload / psychology

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  • (PMID = 9520604.001).
  • [ISSN] 1077-2928
  • [Journal-full-title] Women's health (Hillsdale, N.J.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Womens Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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70. Barbini N, Gorini G, Ferrucci L, Biggeri A: [The role of professional activity in arterial hypertension]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon; 2007 Apr-Jun;29(2):174-81
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  • OBJECTIVES: Our aim is to evaluate if work conditions or job strain related to professional activity or to life styles represent a risk factor for arterial hypertension and whether this effect of hypertension is independent of age.
  • Information were obtained by occupational health physicians, using 3 questionnaires:--working conditions (exposure to certain risks or job strain);--life styles and self evaluation of health (Nottingham Health Profile);--objective information on health status.
  • The present work consider only parameters that in other studies have been found associated with CVD morbidity, including:.
  • (1) working conditions, (2) subjective assessment of work, (3) specific job strain perceived Hypertension was considered as SAP > or =160 mm/Hg and/or DAP > or =90 mm/Hg, or current antihypertensive treatment.
  • Risk estimation showed a statistically significant association with certain work-related factors such as: shift work (O.R.
  • 1.43), sitting work (O.R.
  • 1.41), being interrupted at work (O.R.
  • 1.35), not being able to take eyes off work (O.R. 1.61).
  • The multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that the variables referred to cognitive aspects and work organization tended to be associated to arterial hypertension even when exposure ceased.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We observed that both some physical aspects of work and cognitive organisation aspects, are strongly associated with arterial hypertension.
  • An important element was found to be the subjective assessment that workers give to their work.
  • From an intervention point of view, this aspects should be considered as possible reducible risk factor.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Italy / epidemiology. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Prevalence. Questionnaires. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution. Stress, Psychological. Work Schedule Tolerance. Workload

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  • (PMID = 17886759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-7830
  • [Journal-full-title] Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Ital Med Lav Ergon
  • [Language] ita
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / N01 AG916413; United States / Intramural NIH HHS / / Z99 AG999999
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS45612; NLM/ PMC2758665
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71. Costa G: [Framework of work stress for the evaluation and management of risk]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon; 2009 Apr-Jun;31(2):188-90
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  • [Title] [Framework of work stress for the evaluation and management of risk].
  • Occupational stress is the negative consequence of a distorted relation between the worker and the work environment (mental/physical load, work organisation, social relationships), where both components, that is work demands and human resources, are strictly interacting in causing more or less severe mal-adjustment and health impairment.
  • This is mediated by several intervening factors, related not only to high cognitive and emotional stress, but also to scarce coping strategies, that are strongly influenced by personal characteristics, lack of control on working conditions, and social support.
  • Hence high costs for the individual, the company and the whole society, not only in terms of workers' health and well-being, but also as regards work ability and performance efficiency, as well as social consequences and compensative interventions.
  • The Occupational Health Physician has to deal with these multidimensional and multifaceted aspects of work stress by different and concurrent approaches, at both group and individual levels, with epidemiological and clinical perspectives, enacting preventive and therapeutic strategies.
  • Both "external" work load and individual "responses" have to be properly considered and addressed not only for the evaluation of at fitness to work, but also to plan corrective actions.
  • Hence, the OHP has to act in closer collaboration with work psychologists, sociologists, human resources managers and work organisation experts.
  • [MeSH-major] Occupational Diseases / prevention & control. Occupational Health. Risk Management. Stress, Psychological / complications. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Social Environment. Work Schedule Tolerance. Workload

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  • (PMID = 19827282.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-7830
  • [Journal-full-title] Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Ital Med Lav Ergon
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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72. Karcher CJ, Linden LL: Is work conducive to self-destruction? Suicide Life Threat Behav; 1982;12(3):151-75
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  • [Title] Is work conducive to self-destruction?
  • While the current literature contains numerous studies and even more numerous assumptions linking aspects of the work setting, stress, and mortality; no systematic investigation has been made of possible patterns of stress-induced self-destructive behaviors among the work settings per se.
  • [MeSH-major] Occupational Diseases / mortality. Stress, Psychological / mortality. Work

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  • (PMID = 7179404.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-0234
  • [Journal-full-title] Suicide & life-threatening behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Suicide Life Threat Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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73. Henderson M, Harvey SB, Overland S, Mykletun A, Hotopf M: Work and common psychiatric disorders. J R Soc Med; 2011 May;104(5):198-207
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  • [Title] Work and common psychiatric disorders.
  • As a result the area of work and psychiatric disorders is a high priority for policymakers.
  • There are two main agendas: for many researchers and clinicians the focus is on the need to overcome stigma and ensure people with severe psychiatric disorders have meaningful work; however the public health agenda predominantly relates to the more common disorders such as depression and anxiety, which contribute a greater burden of disability benefits and pensions.
  • In this review we propose a staged model where different risk and protective factors contribute to the onset of psychiatric disorders in the working population, the onset of short-term sickness absence, and the transition from short- to long-term absence.
  • We also examine strategies to manage psychiatric disorder in the workforce with a view towards returning the employee to work.
  • [MeSH-major] Employment. Mental Disorders / rehabilitation. Sick Leave. Stress, Psychological / complications. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Absenteeism. Anxiety Disorders / rehabilitation. Depression / rehabilitation. Great Britain / epidemiology. Health Status. Health Surveys. Humans. Mass Screening. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Psychiatric Status Rating Scales. Rehabilitation, Vocational. Retirement. Social Environment. Stereotyping. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 21558098.001).
  • [ISSN] 1758-1095
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J R Soc Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3089873
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74. Weil ZM, Bowers SL, Dow ER, Nelson RJ: Maternal aggression persists following lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the immune system. Physiol Behav; 2006 Apr 15;87(4):694-9
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  • Previous work has suggested that animals can suppress the behavioral symptoms of sickness in order to engage in adaptive behaviors.
  • Further, LPS treatment also altered non-agonistic behavior during the aggression test as indicated by reduced social investigation of the intruder and an increased time spent immobile during the session.
  • [MeSH-major] Aggression / physiology. Lactation / immunology. Maternal Behavior / physiology. Reaction Time / immunology. Sick Role

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  • (PMID = 16490223.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9384
  • [Journal-full-title] Physiology & behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Physiol. Behav.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH 57535; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH 66144; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P30 NS 045758
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; W980KJ009P / Corticosterone
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75. Rohrlich JB: The dynamics of work addiction. Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci; 1981;18(2):147-56
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  • [Title] The dynamics of work addiction.
  • [MeSH-major] Personality. Work

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  • (PMID = 7298306.001).
  • [ISSN] 0333-7308
  • [Journal-full-title] The Israel journal of psychiatry and related sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Isr J Psychiatry Relat Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ISRAEL
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76. Bültmann U, Kant IJ, Schröer CA, Kasl SV: The relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and fatigue and psychological distress. Int Arch Occup Environ Health; 2002 Apr;75(4):259-66
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  • [Title] The relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and fatigue and psychological distress.
  • OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations between psychosocial work characteristics and fatigue in employees in the Maastricht Cohort Study.
  • A second objective was to compare the relationships for fatigue versus psychological distress with these psychosocial work characteristics.
  • Psychosocial work characteristics comprised: psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support at work as measured by the Job Content Questionnaire, as well as emotional demands at work, physical demands at work, job insecurity, and conflict with supervisor/co-worker, which were assessed with items from existing Dutch questionnaires.
  • RESULTS: Low decision latitude and low social support at work were associated with fatigue in both men and women.
  • Associations were also found between emotional demands at work, job insecurity, physical demands and conflict with supervisor and fatigue in men; and high psychological demands and fatigue in women.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The study provides strong support for associations between psychosocial work characteristics and fatigue in men and women, even after adjustment for psychological distress.
  • Moreover, it suggests some differential effects of psychosocial work characteristics on fatigue and psychological distress.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cohort Studies. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Netherlands / epidemiology. Questionnaires. Work Schedule Tolerance

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  • (PMID = 11981660.001).
  • [ISSN] 0340-0131
  • [Journal-full-title] International archives of occupational and environmental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Arch Occup Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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77. Howell AJ, Watson DC: Perceived dysfunction of male-typed and female-typed DSM-IV personality disorder criteria. J Pers Disord; 2002 Dec;16(6):536-48
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  • To determine whether female-typed personality disorders are associated with a different pattern of dysfunction than male-typed disorders, lay judges (N = 216) estimated the amount of social impairment, occupational impairment, and personal distress related to symptoms of personality disorders.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms. Personality Disorders / psychology

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  • (PMID = 12616829.001).
  • [ISSN] 0885-579X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of personality disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pers. Disord.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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78. Reinberg A, Ashkenazi I: Internal desynchronization of circadian rhythms and tolerance to shift work. Chronobiol Int; 2008 Jul;25(4):625-43
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  • [Title] Internal desynchronization of circadian rhythms and tolerance to shift work.
  • Intolerance to shift work may result from individual susceptibility to an internal desynchronization.
  • Some shift workers (SW) who show desynchronization of their circadian rhythms (e.g., sleep-wake, body temperature, and grip strength of both hands) exhibit symptoms of SW intolerance, such as sleep alteration, persistent fatigue, sleep medication dependence, and mood disturbances, including depression.
  • Existing time series data previously collected from 48 male Caucasian French SW were reanalyzed specifically to test the hypothesis that internal synchronization of circadian rhythms is associated with SW intolerance and symptoms.
  • Three groups were formed thereafter: SW with good tolerance (n=14); SW with poor tolerance, as evident by medical complaints for at least one year (n=19); and former SW (n=15) with very poor tolerance and who had been discharged from night work for at 1.5 yr span but who were symptom-free at the time of the study.
  • Individual and longitudinal time series of selected variables (self-recorded sleep-wake data using a sleep log, self-measured grip strength of both hands using a Colin Gentile dynamometer, and oral temperature using a clinical thermometer) were gathered for at least 15 days, including during one or two night shifts.
  • The mean (+/-SEM) age of SW with good tolerance was greater than that of SW with poor tolerance (44.9+/-2.1 yrs vs. 40.1+/-2.6 yrs, p<.001) and of former SW discharged from night work (very poor tolerance; 33.4+/-1.7, p<.001).
  • The shift-work duration (yrs) was longer in SW with good than poor tolerance (19.9+/-2.2 yrs vs. 15.7+/-2.2; p<0.002) and former SW (10.7+/-1.2; p<.0001).
  • The correlation between subject age and shift-work duration was stronger in tolerant SW (r=0.97, p<.0001) than in non-tolerant SW (r=0.80, p<0.001) and greater than that of former SW (r=0.72, p<.01).
  • In Former SW (i.e., 15 individuals assessed in follow-up studies done 1.5 to 20 yrs after return to day work), both symptoms of intolerance and internal desynchronization were reduced or absent.
  • The results suggest that non-tolerant SW are particularly sensitive to the internal desynchronization of their circadian time organization.
  • [MeSH-major] Circadian Rhythm. Work Schedule Tolerance
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Body Temperature. Body Temperature Regulation. Depression / complications. Fatigue. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate. Sleep. Time Factors. Wakefulness. Work

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  • (PMID = 18622820.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-6073
  • [Journal-full-title] Chronobiology international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chronobiol. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Bozsik C, Áspán N, Gádoros J, Inántsy-Pap J, Halász J: [Conduct symptoms and emotional decision making in non-clinical adolescents]. Psychiatr Hung; 2014;29(4):378-85
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  • [Title] [Conduct symptoms and emotional decision making in non-clinical adolescents].
  • BACKGROUND: In adults with antisocial personality disorder, literature data indicate alterations in emotional decision making and in the working of the prefrontal cortex.
  • Similar alterations were described in adolescents with psychopathic traits, however, a dimensional link was not established between behavioral variables and variables associated with decision making.
  • The aim of the present study was to describe the relationship between externalizing symptoms and emotional decision making in non-clinical adolescents.
  • The parent version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was used to assess behavioral problems.
  • The number of risky choices did not depend on Raven IQ, age, and other behavioral scales of SDQ.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Even subthreshold conduct symptoms are associated with altered emotional decision making in adolescents, what might be important in the development of antisocial behavior.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms / psychology. Decision Making. Emotions

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  • (PMID = 25569827.001).
  • [ISSN] 0237-7896
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychiatria Hungarica : A Magyar Pszichiátriai Társaság tudományos folyóirata
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychiatr Hung
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
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80. Schulte P, Vainio H: Well-being at work--overview and perspective. Scand J Work Environ Health; 2010 Sep;36(5):422-9
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  • [Title] Well-being at work--overview and perspective.
  • This paper provides an overview of and perspective on the concept of well-being at work.
  • Well-being is a term that reflects not only on one's health but satisfaction with work and life.
  • Well-being is a summative concept that characterizes the quality of working lives, including occupational safety and health (OSH) aspects, and it may be a major determinant of productivity at the individual, enterprise and societal levels.
  • and (v) should interventions aimed at improving well-being at work focus on more than work-related factors?
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Efficiency. Employment / psychology. Happiness. Occupational Health. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 20686738.001).
  • [ISSN] 1795-990X
  • [Journal-full-title] Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Scand J Work Environ Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Finland
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81. Vogel R, Bell V, Blumenthal S, Neumann NU, Schüttler R: Work and psychiatric illness: the significance of the posthospitalization occupational environment for the course of psychiatric illnesses. Eur Arch Psychiatry Neurol Sci; 1989;238(4):213-9
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  • [Title] Work and psychiatric illness: the significance of the posthospitalization occupational environment for the course of psychiatric illnesses.
  • The value of the reintegration and rehabilitation of inpatients vocationally was studied.
  • Certain of the vocational experiences (unemployment and stressful working conditions) of former psychiatric inpatients were examined, with attention being paid to their stabilizing or destabilizing effect on symptomatic behaviour.
  • A cohort of 230 first-time admissions for treatment of various disorders were interviewed while hospitalized and 1 year later.
  • A 20-item list prepared by INFAS was used for indexing stressful working conditions.
  • Stressful working conditions appear to have very different effects in schizophrenia and affective disorders, viz. deterioration and amelioration of psychopathological syndromes respectively.
  • [MeSH-major] Mental Disorders / psychology. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 2759156.001).
  • [ISSN] 0175-758X
  • [Journal-full-title] European archives of psychiatry and neurological sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Arch Psychiatry Neurol Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY, WEST
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82. Tomasina F: [Problems of work world and its impact on health. Current financial crisis]. Rev Salud Publica (Bogota); 2012 Jun;14 Suppl 1:56-67
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  • [Title] [Problems of work world and its impact on health. Current financial crisis].
  • [Transliterated title] Los problemas en el mundo del trabajo y su impacto en salud. Crisis financiera actual.
  • Health and work are complex processes.
  • According to this, it is possible to establish that work world is extremely complex and heterogeneous.
  • In this world, "old" or traditional risks coexist with "modern risks", derived from the new models of work organization and the incorporation of new technologies.
  • Unemployment, work relationships precariousness and work risks outsourcing are results of neoliberal strategies.
  • Some negative results of health-sickness process derived from transformation in work world and current global economic crisis have been noticed in current work conditions.
  • Finally, the need for reconstructing policies focusing on this situation derived from work world is suggested.
  • [MeSH-major] Economic Recession. Occupational Health. Social Problems. Work

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  • (PMID = 23258747.001).
  • [ISSN] 0124-0064
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de salud pública (Bogotá, Colombia)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Salud Publica (Bogota)
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Colombia
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83. Iakovleva NV, Lisitsyna KA, Korushnov IuG: [A method of simultaneous measurement of the total psychophysiologic characteristics of an operator engaged in a tracking task]. Med Tekh; 1991 Mar-Apr;(2):3-5
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  • The authors suggest a method permitting measurements of emotional tension, the level of emotional stability, preparedness for emergency actions, and of the operator's work fitness.
  • As the method is realized, the process of tracing dynamic objects is being simulated; at the preset moments of time a light or acoustic signal is employed as a signal requiring an emergency action; the tracing characteristics are recorded as are the pulse rate and cutaneogalvanic reactions of the test subject as well as the time characteristics of a reaction.
  • [MeSH-major] Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Emergencies / psychology. Galvanic Skin Response / physiology. Humans. Pulse / physiology. Reaction Time / physiology. Stress, Psychological / physiopathology

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  • (PMID = 2056877.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-8075
  • [Journal-full-title] Meditsinskaia tekhnika
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Tekh
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] USSR
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84. Vinet A, Vézina M, Brisson C, Bernard PM: Piecework, repetitive work and medicine use in the clothing industry. Soc Sci Med; 1989;28(12):1283-8
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  • [Title] Piecework, repetitive work and medicine use in the clothing industry.
  • This study was designed to examine the potential effects of severe time constraints on workers' health.
  • Medicine use is considered to be an indicator of non-specific morbidity that is worthy of interest in industrial health research when it is possible to compare workers who share the same culture and socio-economic characteristics, but are submitted to different work conditions.
  • In the clothing industry, our hypotheses were that (1) piecework paid operators would have a higher percentage of medicine users than the hourly paid and (2) operators who did repetitive work would have a higher percentage of medicine users than those who did non-repetitive work.
  • The probability was also higher for women who did repetitive work than for women who did non-repetitive work: OR = 2.43 (1.26-3.60).
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Therapy. Occupations. Self Medication. Work

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  • (PMID = 2734627.001).
  • [ISSN] 0277-9536
  • [Journal-full-title] Social science & medicine (1982)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Soc Sci Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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85. Emanuel F, Colombo L, Ghislieri C: [Emotional well-being and discomfort at work in call center]. G Ital Med Lav Ergon; 2014 Apr-Jun;36(2):95-101
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  • [Title] [Emotional well-being and discomfort at work in call center].
  • [Transliterated title] Benessere e malessere emotivo al lavoro nel contesto del call center.
  • INTRODUCTION: The theme of well-being and discomfort at work has attracted increasing interest in recent years.
  • The present study, according to Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R), inquires the effects of personal (optimism, internal locus of control) and organizational resources (job autonomy, supervisors and colleagues support) and general (work-to-family conflict, workload) and context specific demands (emotional dissonance) on emotional well-being and discomfort at work in call centre employees.
  • RESULTS: Personal and organizational resources improve emotional well-being at work, except for colleagues support.
  • Optimism and supervisors support reduce emotional discomfort at work.
  • Among organizational demands, work-family conflict and emotional dissonance increase emotional discomfort at work and, to a lesser extent, reduce the emotional well-being at work.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results, according to theoretical model, highlight the different role of demands and resources on emotional well-being and discomfort at work.
  • The results suggest organizational politics and investments to promote emotional well-being at work, in particular training program to support emotional skills, training for supervisors, increasing job autonomy and support to work-family balance.
  • [MeSH-major] Telephone. Work. Workload / psychology. Workplace / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Appointments and Schedules. Burnout, Professional / psychology. Female. Humans. Internet. Italy. Male. Middle Aged. Questionnaires. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Work Schedule Tolerance / psychology

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  • (PMID = 25059030.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-7830
  • [Journal-full-title] Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] G Ital Med Lav Ergon
  • [Language] ita
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Italy
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86. Eells TD, Showalter CR: Work-related stress in American trial judges. Bull Am Acad Psychiatry Law; 1994;22(1):71-83
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  • [Title] Work-related stress in American trial judges.
  • This study examines work-related stress among American trial judges using a relational model of stress, which emphasizes an individual's appraisals in a person-situation relationship.
  • A representative sample of 88 judges completed three questionnaires addressing type and magnitude of specific work-related stressors, psychological stress symptoms, and psychosocial moderators of stress.
  • The most stressful aspects of work relate to poorly prepared or disrespectful counsel, exercising judicial management and discretion, and highly emotional cases under public scrutiny.
  • Correlational analyses show that stress is associated with cognitive, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, including a possible adverse impact on decision-making capacity.
  • [MeSH-major] Jurisprudence. Occupational Diseases / etiology. Stress, Psychological / etiology. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 8193391.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-634X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bull Am Acad Psychiatry Law
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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87. Nielsen MB, Bültmann U, Madsen IE, Martin M, Christensen U, Diderichsen F, Rugulies R: Health, work, and personal-related predictors of time to return to work among employees with mental health problems. Disabil Rehabil; 2012;34(15):1311-6
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  • [Title] Health, work, and personal-related predictors of time to return to work among employees with mental health problems.
  • PURPOSE: To identify health-, personal- and work-related factors predictive of return to work (RTW) in employees sick-listed due to common mental health problems, such as, stress, depression, burnout, and anxiety.
  • RESULTS: At baseline, about 9% of respondents had quit their job, 10% were dismissed and the remaining 82% were still working for the same employer.
  • The mean time to RTW, measured from the first day of absence, was 25 weeks (median = 21) and at the end of follow-up (52 weeks) 85% had returned to work.
  • In the fitted Cox model we found that fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for depression predicted a longer time to RTW (HR: 0.61, CI: 0.45-0.84), whereas a better self-rated health predicted a shorter time to RTW (HR: 1.18, CI: 1.03-1.34).
  • Employees working in the municipal (HR: 0.62, CI: 0.41-0.94) and private sector (HR: 0.65, CI: 0.44-0.96) returned to work slower compared to employees working in the governmental sector.
  • CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that time to RTW is determined by both health- and work-related factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Employment. Health Status. Mental Disorders / rehabilitation. Work
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Denmark. Depression / rehabilitation. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Forecasting. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Proportional Hazards Models. Prospective Studies. Psychiatric Status Rating Scales. Questionnaires. Rehabilitation, Vocational. Sick Leave. Stress, Psychological / rehabilitation. Time Factors. Workplace

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  • (PMID = 22200251.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-5165
  • [Journal-full-title] Disability and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Disabil Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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88. St-Hilaire A, Docherty NM: Language reactivity and work functioning in schizophrenia. Schizophr Res; 2005 Jun 15;75(2-3):241-6
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  • [Title] Language reactivity and work functioning in schizophrenia.
  • It is unknown, however, whether affective reactivity of speech is associated with stress responsiveness of symptoms in the real world.
  • This study examines whether language-reactive patients report more stress-related impairments in work functioning than language-nonreactive patients.
  • Forty-six patients provided speech samples and completed a work history interview.
  • It was found that the language-reactive patients were more likely than the language-nonreactive patients to endorse items pertaining to social anxiety and difficulty relating to others as reasons for their work difficulties.

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  • (PMID = 15885516.001).
  • [ISSN] 0920-9964
  • [Journal-full-title] Schizophrenia research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Schizophr. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH0587783
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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89. Wilhelm K, Kovess V, Rios-Seidel C, Finch A: Work and mental health. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol; 2004 Nov;39(11):866-73
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  • [Title] Work and mental health.
  • We sought to provide an overview of research related to work and mental health and consider future research directions.
  • The key words "occupation" or "work" were searched in combination with the key words "mental health", "risk factors", "disorders", "depression", "suicide", "trauma", "stress" or "substance use".
  • Workplace risk factors for depression involve situations promoting lack of autonomy, and involving "caring" for others as part of the work role, particularly where there is dependence on others for their livelihood.
  • There appears to be a bi-directional relationship between personality and work, so that people are drawn to particular occupations, but the occupations then have an effect on them.
  • CONCLUSION: The research questions pertaining to mental health are varied and will determine what mental health issues are of interest and the models of work applicable.

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  • (PMID = 15549238.001).
  • [ISSN] 0933-7954
  • [Journal-full-title] Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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90. Lennerlöf L: Learned helplessness at work. Int J Health Serv; 1988;18(2):207-22
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  • [Title] Learned helplessness at work.
  • Some empirical findings are presented, indicating a connection between certain work characteristics and learned helplessness.
  • There is, however, hardly and research on learned helplessness at work.
  • Learned helplessness hypotheses should be tested on data from real life; if applied to work environment research, the theory of learned helplessness could generate important results.
  • [MeSH-major] Depression / psychology. Helplessness, Learned. Work

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  • (PMID = 3288564.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7314
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Health Serv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 77
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91. Torén K, Schiöler L, Söderberg M, Giang KW, Rosengren A: The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men. Occup Environ Med; 2015 Mar;72(3):177-80
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  • [Title] The association between job strain and atrial fibrillation in Swedish men.
  • OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether psychosocial stress defined as high strain based on the job demand-control model increases risk for atrial fibrillation.
  • METHODS: The present study comprised 6035 men born between 1915 and 1925 and free from previous coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and stroke at baseline (1974-1977).
  • Work-related psychosocial stress was measured using a job-exposure matrix for the job demand-control model based on occupation at baseline.
  • The participants were followed from baseline examination until death, hospital discharge or 75 years of age, using the Swedish national register on cause of death and the Swedish hospital discharge register for any registration for atrial fibrillation, resulting in the identification of 436 cases.
  • Data were analysed with Cox regression models with atrial fibrillation as the outcome using high strain as the explanatory variable adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes and socioeconomic status.
  • RESULTS: There was an increased risk for atrial fibrillation in relation to high strain (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.003 to 1.75).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to occupational psychosocial stress defined as high strain may be associated with increased risk for atrial fibrillation.
  • [MeSH-major] Atrial Fibrillation / etiology. Occupational Diseases / etiology. Stress, Psychological / complications. Work / psychology

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  • [Copyright] Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
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  • (PMID = 25523937.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7926
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4345978
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92. Kopp MS, Stauder A, Purebl G, Janszky I, Skrabski A: Work stress and mental health in a changing society. Eur J Public Health; 2008 Jun;18(3):238-44
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  • [Title] Work stress and mental health in a changing society.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this representative study in the Hungarian population was to analyse the association between work-related factors and self-reported mental and physical health after controlling for negative affect and hostility as personality traits.
  • Job insecurity, low control and low social support at work, weekend work hours, job-related life events and dissatisfaction with work and with boss were independent mental health risk factors, but there were important gender differences.
  • CONCLUSION: The results of this large national representative study indicate that independent of negative affect and hostility, a cluster of stressful work-related psychosocial conditions accounts for a substantial part of variation in self-reported mental and physical health of the economically active population in Hungary.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Cross-Sectional Studies. Depression / diagnosis. Depression / epidemiology. Female. Humans. Hungary / epidemiology. Linear Models. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Sex Factors. Social Support. Work Schedule Tolerance / psychology. Workplace

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  • (PMID = 17686795.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-360X
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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93. Posada C, Moore DJ, Woods SP, Vigil O, Ake C, Perry W, Hassanein TI, Letendre SL, Grant I, HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center Group: Implications of hepatitis C virus infection for behavioral symptoms and activities of daily living. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol; 2010 Jul;32(6):637-44
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  • [Title] Implications of hepatitis C virus infection for behavioral symptoms and activities of daily living.
  • Despite these previous findings, little work has been done to examine neurobehavioral symptoms associated with HCV infection.
  • These results show that a subset of HCV-infected individuals report clinically elevated behavioral symptoms.
  • Clinical implications for the assessment and management of elevated behavioral symptoms in HCV are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Activities of Daily Living / psychology. Behavioral Symptoms / etiology. Behavioral Symptoms / virology. Hepatitis C / complications. Hepatitis C / psychology

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  • (PMID = 20603743.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-411X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Exp Neuropsychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH 62512-07; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P01 DA012065; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P01 DA012065-08; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P01DA12065-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS203317; NLM/ PMC2898888
  • [Investigator] Grant I; Atkinson JH; Ellis RJ; McCutchan JA; Marcotte TD; Sherman M; Hale BR; Ellis RJ; McCutchan JA; Letendre S; Capparelli E; Schrier R; Marquie-Beck J; Alexander T; Heaton RK; Cherner M; Woods SP; Moore DJ; Dawson M; Jernigan T; Fennema-Notestine C; Archibald SL; Hesselink J; Annese J; Taylor MJ; Schweinsburg B; Masliah E; Everall I; Achim C; Richman D; McCutchan JA; Everall I; Lipton S; McCutchan JA; Atkinson JH; Ellis RJ; Letendre S; Atkinson JH; von Jaeger R; Gamst AC; Cushman C; Masys DR; Abramson I; Vaida F; Ake C
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94. Suzuki T, Abe K, Kim M: [Correlations between depression and work problem of workers]. J UOEH; 1986 Mar 20;8 Suppl:195-203
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  • [Title] [Correlations between depression and work problem of workers].
  • Recent increase of depressive patients visiting psychiatric clinics have been attributed to social and other environmental factors including those related to work environment.
  • A questionnaire study was carried out in a Tokyo-based company which manufactures desk calculators and other electronic devices, to investigate associations between psychiatric symptoms related to depression and 32 items on work and work environment.
  • [MeSH-major] Depressive Disorder / etiology. Work

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  • (PMID = 3726302.001).
  • [ISSN] 0387-821X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of UOEH
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. UOEH
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
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95. Bohle P, Willaby H, Quinlan M, McNamara M: Flexible work in call centres: Working hours, work-life conflict & health. Appl Ergon; 2011 Jan;42(2):219-24
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  • [Title] Flexible work in call centres: Working hours, work-life conflict & health.
  • Call-centre workers encounter major psychosocial pressures, including high work intensity and undesirable working hours.
  • Little is known, however, about whether these pressures vary with employment status and how they affect work-life conflict and health.
  • Ninety-three (52%) were permanent full-time workers, 37 (20.7%) were permanent part-time, and 49 (27.4%) were casual employees.
  • Hypothesised structural relationships between employment status, working hours and work organisation, work-life conflict and health were tested using partial least squares modelling in PLS (Chin, 1998).
  • The final model indicated that casual workers reported more variable working hours which were relatively weakly associated with greater dissatisfaction with hours.
  • Conversely, permanent workers reported greater work intensity, which was associated with both lower work schedule control and greater work-life conflict.
  • Greater work-life conflict was associated with more fatigue and psychological symptoms.
  • Labour market factors and the undesirability of longer hours in a stressful, high-intensity work environment appear to have contributed to the results.
  • [MeSH-major] Employment / psychology. Fatigue / psychology. Job Satisfaction. Work Schedule Tolerance / psychology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20696420.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-9126
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied ergonomics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl Ergon
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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96. Corlett EN, Shipley P: Stressful conditions of work: the participative ergonomics approach. J UOEH; 1989 Mar 20;11 Suppl:541-8
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  • [Title] Stressful conditions of work: the participative ergonomics approach.
  • The nature of working stress requires a multi-disciplinary approach for its study.
  • Ergonomics, by its nature multidisciplinary, takes a perspective in which the individual is central and the work and working environment represent the influences to be adjusted.
  • This perspective considers human capacities to have a permissible range of values, within which work demands must be matched.
  • Work demands are more than the physical or mental loads directly related to task performance, since the organisational structure imposes loads.
  • What people expect from work, and what they get, are also important dimensions of matching the job to the person.
  • Work organisation factors such as shift work and repetitive tasks are other stressors, the repetitive work situation is discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Human Engineering. Occupational Medicine. Stress, Physiological. Work

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  • (PMID = 2526358.001).
  • [ISSN] 0387-821X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of UOEH
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. UOEH
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Number-of-references] 3
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97. Steptoe A, Evans O, Fieldman G: Perceptions of control over work: psychophysiological responses to self-paced and externally-paced tasks in an adult population sample. Int J Psychophysiol; 1997 Apr;25(3):211-20
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  • [Title] Perceptions of control over work: psychophysiological responses to self-paced and externally-paced tasks in an adult population sample.
  • This experiment tested the hypothesis that perceptions of control over work pace would modulate cardiovascular reactions to mental stress tests.
  • Work pace requirements were imposed on the externally-paced group, with performance requirements being set to equate those in the self-paced condition.
  • This was done to equate work demands.
  • Results are discussed in relation to the literature on control and physiological stress responsivity, and their implications for understanding the health consequences of lack of control at work are considered.
  • [MeSH-major] Work / physiology. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 9105945.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-8760
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Psychophysiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
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98. Ghaddar A, Ronda E, Nolasco A: Work ability, psychosocial hazards and work experience in prison environments. Occup Med (Lond); 2011 Oct;61(7):503-8
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  • [Title] Work ability, psychosocial hazards and work experience in prison environments.
  • BACKGROUND: Work ability is predicted by age- and work-related psychosocial hazards; however, its association with work experience has not been studied.
  • Work ability has not been studied in prison environments as well.
  • AIMS: To describe work ability and its associates among prison workers.
  • Prison workers were randomly administered a voluntary anonymous questionnaire to measure work ability [Work Ability Index (WAI)], work-related psychosocial hazards (Spanish version of COPSOQ), sociodemographic, lifestyle and work-related variables.
  • Quantitative and emotional demands, family work conflict, low work control, low autonomy, low social support from colleagues and stress had negative significant associations with WAI.
  • Age, which highly correlated with work experience (Spearman's r = 0.85), had significant association with WAI (beta = -0.62).
  • In the stepwise linear regression, the association between age and WAI lost statistical significance after controlling for work experience, which maintained significant correlation with WAI (beta = -0.37).
  • CONCLUSIONS: The apparent association between age and WAI was confounded by work experience.
  • Interventions to improve work ability among prison workers may benefit from results of this study to focus their efforts on the risk groups in such a psychologically demanding work environment rarely examined in previous research.
  • [MeSH-major] Employment / psychology. Occupational Health. Prisons. Social Environment. Work Capacity Evaluation

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  • (PMID = 21891780.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-8405
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational medicine (Oxford, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Med (Lond)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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99. Rosenzweig JM, Brennan EM, Ogilvie AM: Work-family fit: voices of parents of children with emotional and behavioral disorders. Soc Work; 2002 Oct;47(4):415-24
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  • [Title] Work-family fit: voices of parents of children with emotional and behavioral disorders.
  • Employed parents of children with emotional or behavioral disorders overcome significant challenges to fulfill their daily work-family responsibilities; however, their experiences in meeting these multiple demands have not been examined.
  • Results revealed that parents experience a serious lack of community-based services and resources necessary to support work and family obligations in a meaningful way.
  • [MeSH-major] Affective Symptoms / psychology. Child Behavior Disorders / psychology. Employment / psychology. Family / psychology. Parenting / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Psychological. Adult. Caregivers / psychology. Child. Child Care / methods. Child Care / psychology. Female. Focus Groups. Humans. Male. Qualitative Research. Social Work, Psychiatric. United States


100. Khadzhiolova I, Mincheva L, Topalova M, Deianov Kh: [An evaluation of the strain in the work of teachers]. Probl Khig; 1994;19:50-65
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  • [Title] [An evaluation of the strain in the work of teachers].
  • [Transliterated title] Otsenka na naprezhenieto pri rabota na uchiteli.
  • Psychophysiological studies on teachers' work include generally the evaluation of occupational stressors influencing the work load and strain and the assessment of transient and long-term changes in teachers' functional state and health due to these stressors.
  • Results from investigations of some changes in the functional state of the organism of female teachers working in secondary and technical schools of different profiles were presented in this study.
  • The following parameters were applied: subjective feeling of fatigue, heart rate [HR], excretion rates of 11-oxycorticosteroids (11-OCS), adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) during work.
  • According to the mean HR values during work a moderate cardio-vascular strain was obtained (HR between 80-90 beats) min.
  • Transient HR values over 100 beats/min were registered during periods connected with specific stressful working conditions.
  • Our data reveal the usefulness of the indices and procedures applied for the evaluation of teachers' strain at work.
  • [MeSH-major] Stress, Psychological / psychology. Teaching. Work / psychology

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  • (PMID = 7845993.001).
  • [ISSN] 0323-9179
  • [Journal-full-title] Problemi na khigienata
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Probl Khig
  • [Language] bul
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] BULGARIA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 11-Hydroxycorticosteroids; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine; YKH834O4BH / Epinephrine
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