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1. Roording-Ragetlie S, Klip H, Buitelaar J, Slaats-Willemse D: Working memory training in children with neuropsychiatric disorders and mild to borderline intellectual functioning, the role of coaching; a double-blind randomized controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry; 2017 Mar 28;17(1):114
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Autism Spectrum Disorder.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Working memory training in children with neuropsychiatric disorders and mild to borderline intellectual functioning, the role of coaching; a double-blind randomized controlled trial.
  • BACKGROUND: Working memory training (WMT) has been shown to offer therapeutic benefits to both patients with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and patients with mild to borderline Intellectual Disabilities (MBID; 60 < IQ < 85).
  • Owing to the nature of double-blind research designs in RCTs, children have received non-specific coaching not based on their actual training performance.
  • This study therefore investigated the efficacy of a less intensive, but more prolonged Cogmed WMT (including active personalized coaching and feedback) in reducing behavioral symptoms and improving neurocognitive functioning and academic achievements in children with MBID and neuropsychiatric disorders.
  • Both groups will undergo a neurocognitive assessment (working memory, executive functioning, academic achievements) before and after training and complete several questionnaires (behavioral problems, parenting style) with a 6 months follow-up.
  • DISCUSSION: This study will add to the literature since the role of coaching in Cogmed WMT has not been studied before.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Clinical Protocols. Double-Blind Method. Executive Function. Female. Humans. Male. Memory, Short-Term. Schools. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
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  • (PMID = 28351374.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-244X
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ADHD / ASD / Coaching / Mild to borderline intellectual functioning / Randomized controlled trial / Working memory training
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2. Wohleb ES: Neuron-Microglia Interactions in Mental Health Disorders: "For Better, and For Worse". Front Immunol; 2016;7:544

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Persistent cognitive and behavioral symptoms that characterize many mental health disorders arise from impaired neuroplasticity in several key corticolimbic brain regions.
  • Impaired neuron-microglia interactions are implicated in mental health disorders because rodent stress models lead to concomitant neuronal dystrophy and alterations in microglia morphology and function.
  • Additional work shows that microglia have varied phenotypes in specific brain regions, which may underlie divergent neuroplasticity observed in corticolimbic structures following stress exposure.
  • These findings indicate that neuron-microglia interactions are critical mediators of the interface between adaptive, homeostatic neuronal function and the neurobiology of mental health disorders.

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  • (PMID = 27965671.001).
  • [ISSN] 1664-3224
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in immunology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front Immunol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; anxiety / depression / microglia / neuroimmune / neuroinflammation / neuroplasticity / parainflammation / post-traumatic stress disorder
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3. Mosher VAL, Swain MG, Pang JXQ, Kaplan GG, Sharkey KA, MacQueen GM, Goodyear BG: Primary Biliary Cholangitis Alters Functional Connections of the Brain's Deep Gray Matter. Clin Transl Gastroenterol; 2017 Jul 27;8(7):e107
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Previous neuroimaging studies of non-hepatic diseases suggest that these symptoms are often associated with dysfunction of deep gray matter brain regions.
  • Fatigue, itch, complete response to UDCA, and verbal working memory performance were also associated with altered rsFC of deep gray matter.
  • These results may guide future approaches to define how PBC leads to altered brain connectivity and provide insight into novel targets for treating PBC-associated brain dysfunction and behavioral symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 28749455.001).
  • [ISSN] 2155-384X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical and translational gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Transl Gastroenterol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Moncrieff J, Cohen D, Porter S: The psychoactive effects of psychiatric medication: the elephant in the room. J Psychoactive Drugs; 2013 Nov-Dec;45(5):409-15
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  • We discuss how psychoactive effects produced by different drugs prescribed in psychiatric practice might modify various disturbing and distressing symptoms, and we also consider the costs of these psychoactive effects on the mental well-being of the user.
  • We consider how the reality of psychoactive effects undermines the idea that psychiatric drugs work by targeting underlying disease processes, since psychoactive effects can themselves directly modify mental and behavioral symptoms and thus affect the results of placebo-controlled trials.
  • Extensive research is needed to clarify the range of acute and longer-term mental, behavioral, and physical effects induced by psychiatric drugs, both during and after consumption and withdrawal, to enable users and prescribers to exploit their psychoactive effects judiciously in a safe and more informed manner.

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  • (PMID = 24592667.001).
  • [ISSN] 0279-1072
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of psychoactive drugs
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Psychoactive Drugs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Psychotropic Drugs
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4118946
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5. Gu Z, Liu W, Wei J, Yan Z: Regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors by metabotropic glutamate receptor 7. J Biol Chem; 2012 Mar 23;287(13):10265-75
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  • These data suggest that mGluR7, by affecting the cofilin/actin signaling, regulates NMDAR trafficking and function.
  • Because ablation of mGluR7 leads to a variety of behavioral symptoms related to PFC dysfunction, such as impaired working memory and reduced anxiety and depression, our results provide a potential mechanism for understanding the role of mGluR7 in mental health and disorders.

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  • (PMID = 22287544.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-351X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH084233; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH085774; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH84233; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH85774
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Actin Depolymerizing Factors; 0 / Actins; 0 / Dlgh4 protein, rat; 0 / Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; 0 / metabotropic glutamate receptor 7; EC 2.7.4.8 / Dlgh4 protein, mouse; EC 2.7.4.8 / Guanylate Kinase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3322988
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6. Chaturvedi SK, Hamza A, Sharma MP: Changes in distressing behavior perceived by family of persons with schizophrenia at home - 25 years later. Indian J Psychol Med; 2014 Jul;36(3):282-7

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia disorders as well as their symptoms cause distress to the family members or caregivers, which may cause poor quality of life.
  • AIMS: To determine if there was any change in the perception of distressful symptoms of schizophrenia, by the family members, now, 25 years after the initial studies in the same centre.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-six consecutive and consenting new cases diagnosed as schizophrenia were administered the Scale for Assessment of Family Distress to identify the amount of distress caused by each of the symptoms reported.
  • RESULTS: Symptoms like does not do work and earn, does not sleep, and does not do household tasks were reported as the commonest distressing symptoms in both the samples, however, in the 1988 sample, negative symptoms like, slow in doing things, social withdrawal and has few leisure interests, were the commonest, in the present sample behavioral symptoms like beats and assaults others, threatens, is abusive and talks nonsense were the commonest distressing symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 25035552.001).
  • [ISSN] 0253-7176
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of psychological medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Psychol Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4100414
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Expressed emotions / QOL / family distress / mental illness / schizophrenia
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7. Stellman JM, Smith RP, Katz CL, Sharma V, Charney DS, Herbert R, Moline J, Luft BJ, Markowitz S, Udasin I, Harrison D, Baron S, Landrigan PJ, Levin SM, Southwick S: Enduring mental health morbidity and social function impairment in world trade center rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers: the psychological dimension of an environmental health disaster. Environ Health Perspect; 2008 Sep;116(9):1248-53
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  • [Title] Enduring mental health morbidity and social function impairment in world trade center rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers: the psychological dimension of an environmental health disaster.
  • OBJECTIVES: Our objective in this study was to describe mental health outcomes, social function impairment, and psychiatric comorbidity in the WTC worker cohort, as well as perceived symptomatology in workers' children.
  • Point prevalence declined from 13.5% to 9.7% over the 5 years of observation.
  • Comorbidity was extensive and included extremely high risks for impairment of social function.
  • PTSD was significantly associated with loss of family members and friends, disruption of family, work, and social life, and higher rates of behavioral symptoms in children of workers.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Working in 9/11 recovery operations is associated with chronic impairment of mental health and social functioning.

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  • (PMID = 18795171.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-6765
  • [Journal-full-title] Environmental health perspectives
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Environ. Health Perspect.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / U10 OH008232; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / U10 OH008239; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / U10 OH008275; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / U10 OH008223; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / U10 OH008216; United States / PHS HHS / / 200-2002-00384; United States / PHS HHS / / U10 UOH008239; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / U10 OH008225
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2535630
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; World Trade Center / depression / disaster workers / functional impairment / occupational health / post-traumatic stress disorder / stress
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8. Sangroula D, Durrance R, Bhattarai S, Nandakumar T: Neuropsychiatric debut as a presentation of Guillain-Barré Syndrome: An atypical clinical case and literature review. J Clin Neurosci; 2017 Oct;44:245-249

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Many variants of presentation of GBS have been recognized, however a case presenting with primarily psychiatric and autonomic dysfunction preceding muscle weakness has not been cited in the literatures to date.
  • CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a 24-year-old previously healthy male presenting with behavioral symptoms including depression, anxiety, and amnesia, and autonomic dysfunction which preceded muscle weakness by two weeks.
  • CNS imaging and blood work results were unremarkable.
  • The patient responded well to five cycles of inpatient plasmapheresis and short-term selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment with complete recovery of both neurological and behavioral symptoms.
  • CONCLUSION: Though GBS is typically considered a peripheral neuropathy, evidence for CNS involvement exists; GBS should be considered within the differential diagnosis, and neurological features should be monitored, in a patient with new onset unclear psychiatric and CNS symptoms.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28688623.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2653
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; GBS / Guillain Barré Syndrome / Neuropsychiatric symptoms
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9. Adalio CJ, Owens EB, McBurnett K, Hinshaw SP, Pfiffner LJ: Processing Speed Predicts Behavioral Treatment Outcomes in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predominantly Inattentive Type. J Abnorm Child Psychol; 2017 Aug 09;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Processing Speed Predicts Behavioral Treatment Outcomes in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predominantly Inattentive Type.
  • Neuropsychological functioning underlies behavioral symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Children with all forms of ADHD are vulnerable to working memory deficits and children presenting with the inattentive form of ADHD (ADHD-I) appear particularly vulnerable to processing speed deficits.
  • As ADHD-I is the most common form of ADHD presented by children in community settings, it is important to consider how treatment interventions for children with ADHD-I may be affected by deficits in processing speed and working memory.
  • We utilize data collected from 199 children with ADHD-I, aged 7 to 11 years, who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a psychosocial-behavioral intervention.
  • Our aims are first to determine whether processing speed or working memory predict treatment outcomes in ADHD-I symptom severity, and second whether they moderate treatment effects on ADHD-I symptom severity.
  • However, predictive effects of working memory and moderation effects of both working memory and processing speed are not supported in the present study.

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  • (PMID = 28791531.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-2835
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of abnormal child psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Abnorm Child Psychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH077671
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ADHD / Clinical trial / Inattentiveness / Processing speed / Psychosocial intervention
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10. Mamo SK, Oh E, Lin FR: Enhancing Communication in Adults with Dementia and Age-Related Hearing Loss. Semin Hear; 2017 May;38(2):177-183

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Untreated hearing loss can exacerbate common dementia-related behavioral symptoms, such as depression, apathy, agitation.
  • This article reviews alternative hearing care models that we have tested when working with older adults with cognitive impairments.

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  • (PMID = 28522892.001).
  • [ISSN] 0734-0451
  • [Journal-full-title] Seminars in hearing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Semin Hear
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / K23 AG043504; United States / NIDCD NIH HHS / DC / K23 DC011279; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / P50 AG005146; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR001079
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Dementia / communication strategies / over-the-counter amplification
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11. Farlow MR, Shamliyan TA: Benefits and harms of atypical antipsychotics for agitation in adults with dementia. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol; 2017 Jan 19;
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In June 2016, following a protocol developed a priori, we systematically searched several databases for published and unpublished data from randomized controlled trials (RCT), observational studies, and meta-analyses; conducted direct meta-analyses using a random effects model; and graded the quality of evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) working group.
  • When compared with placebo, aripiprazole, risperidone, and olanzapine but not quetiapine result in modest (standardized mean difference <0.5 standard deviations) improvement in neuropsychiatric symptoms.
  • Observational studies suggest that atypical antipsychotics are associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality and extrapyramidal symptoms but higher risk of stroke when compared with conventional antipsychotics.
  • To manage agitation in adults with progressive dementia, clinicians may recommend atypical antipsychotics with continuous monitoring of behavioral symptoms, informing patients and their families or caregivers of the significant risk of adverse effects and baseline risk of acute myocardial infraction and bone fractures.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28111239.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-7862
  • [Journal-full-title] European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur Neuropsychopharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Aripiprazole / Atypical antipsychotics / Evidence-based medicine / Olanzapine / Quality of evidence / Quetiapine / Risperidone
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12. Tang MM, Lin WJ, Zhang JT, Zhao YW, Li YC: Exogenous FGF2 reverses depressive-like behaviors and restores the suppressed FGF2-ERK1/2 signaling and the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis induced by neuroinflammation. Brain Behav Immun; 2017 Nov;66:322-331
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Our previous work demonstrated that neuroinflammation evoked by triple repeated central LPS challenges inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis that were correlated with the depressive-like behavioral symptoms induced by neuroinflammation.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28529071.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2139
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain, behavior, and immunity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Behav. Immun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Depressive-like behavior / Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 / Fibroblast growth factor 2 / Neurogenesis / Neuroinflammation
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13. Martin TJ, Strassburg TJ, Grigg AL, Kim SA, Ririe DG, Eisenach JC: Assessment of Behavioral Disruption in Rats with Abdominal Inflammation Using Visual Cue Titration and the Five-choice Serial-reaction Time Task. Anesthesiology; 2017 Aug;127(2):372-381
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Assessment of Behavioral Disruption in Rats with Abdominal Inflammation Using Visual Cue Titration and the Five-choice Serial-reaction Time Task.
  • BACKGROUND: Both acute and chronic pain result in a number of behavioral symptoms in patients, including cognitive effects such as decreased attention and working memory.
  • Intraperitoneal administration of dilute lactic acid in rodents has been used to induce abdominal inflammation and produce effects in behavioral assays of both sensory-discriminative and affective pain modalities.
  • Scopolamine, however, produced dose-dependent, nonpain-related disruption in sustained attention that was not altered by either ketoprofen or morphine.
  • [MeSH-minor] Analgesics / pharmacology. Animals. Attention / drug effects. Attention / physiology. Cues. Disease Models, Animal. Male. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. Reaction Time / drug effects. Reaction Time / physiology

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  • (PMID = 28542002.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1175
  • [Journal-full-title] Anesthesiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anesthesiology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / P01 GM113852
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Analgesics
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14. Edvardsson D, Sandman PO, Nay R, Karlsson S: Associations between the working characteristics of nursing staff and the prevalence of behavioral symptoms in people with dementia in residential care. Int Psychogeriatr; 2008 Aug;20(4):764-76
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Associations between the working characteristics of nursing staff and the prevalence of behavioral symptoms in people with dementia in residential care.
  • BACKGROUND: Clinical experience suggests that the work characteristics of staff in residential care may influence the well-being of residents with dementia.
  • The aim of this study was to investigate associations between work characteristics of nursing staff and prevalence of behavioral symptoms among people with dementia in residential care settings.
  • METHODS: The self-report job strain assessment scale was used to measure staff perceptions of their working environment, and the Multi Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale to measure the occurrence of behavioral symptoms among residents in 40 residential care units for people with dementia.
  • RESULTS: The findings show that in settings where staff reported high job strain, the prevalence of behavioral symptoms was significantly higher compared to settings where staff reported low job strain.
  • There was no statistically significant association between staff members' self-reported knowledge in caring for people with dementia and prevalence of behavioral symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 18304386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1041-6102
  • [Journal-full-title] International psychogeriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Psychogeriatr
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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15. Braukmann R, Lloyd-Fox S, Blasi A, Johnson MH, Bekkering H, Buitelaar JK, Hunnius S: Diminished socially selective neural processing in 5-month-old infants at high familial risk for autism. Eur J Neurosci; 2017 Oct 23;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • These findings provide an important step in the search for early markers of ASD and highlight the potential for neuroimaging techniques to detect atypical patterns of neural activity prior to the manifestation of most behavioral symptoms.
  • We found that while low-risk infants showed activation to social stimuli in the right posterior temporal cortex, this activation was reduced in infants at high risk for ASD.
  • Although the current sample size was relatively small, our results replicate and extend previous work and provide evidence for a social processing difference in infants at risk for autism.

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  • [Copyright] This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 29057566.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-9568
  • [Journal-full-title] The European journal of neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Neurosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ASD / fNIRS / infant / social stimuli
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16. Arthur PB, Gitlin LN, Kairalla JA, Mann WC: Relationship between the number of behavioral symptoms in dementia and caregiver distress: what is the tipping point? Int Psychogeriatr; 2017 Nov 16;:1-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Relationship between the number of behavioral symptoms in dementia and caregiver distress: what is the tipping point?
  • BACKGROUND: Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are a primary manifestation of brain dysfunction in dementia and a great challenge in caregiving.
  • While BPSD are historically associated with caregiver distress, it is unclear whether there is an identifiable point where BPSD number is associated with heightened caregiver distress.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine if such a tipping point exists to assist clinicians in identifying caregiver compromise.
  • Linear regression was performed with 16 BPSD symptoms on caregiver well-being measures and predictive values determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and pre-defined scores for clinically significant distress.
  • RESULTS: Of the 569 persons with dementia, 549 (96%) displayed at least one BPSD, mean of 5.7 (SD = 3.06) symptoms in the past month.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Caring for persons with four or more BPSD appears to reflect a tipping point for clinically meaningful distress.
  • Findings have implications for clinicians working with persons with dementia and their caregivers and suggest need for continuous monitoring of BPSD and identification of at risk caregivers.

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  • (PMID = 29143722.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-203X
  • [Journal-full-title] International psychogeriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Psychogeriatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer's disease / behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) / carers / dementia / neuropsychiatric symptoms
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17. Fulford D, Piskulic D, Addington J, Kane JM, Schooler NR, Mueser KT: Prospective Relationships Between Motivation and Functioning in Recovery After a First Episode of Schizophrenia. Schizophr Bull; 2017 Aug 18;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Four hundred four individuals (aged 15-40) who presented with a first episode of SZ spectrum disorder (eg, SZ, schizoaffective or schizophreniform disorder, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified) completed assessments of work and school functioning, social functioning, and motivation at 6- and 12-month follow-up, controlling for assessments at study entry.
  • Controlling for cognition, and psychotic and depressive symptoms measured at each time point, motivation at 6 months was associated with work and school participation at 12 months, but work and school participation at 6 months was not associated with motivation at 12 months.
  • Conversely, social functioning at 6 months was associated with motivation at 12 months, but motivation at 6 months was not associated with social functioning at 12 months.
  • Findings suggest that motivation is associated with later occupational, but not social, functioning in the first year following an initial episode of psychosis.
  • Future intervention trials focused on improving occupational functioning in this population may benefit from targeting patient motivation directly (eg, through motivational interviewing), or indirectly by improving relationships and support networks.

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  • [Copyright] © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
  • (PMID = 28981811.001).
  • [ISSN] 1745-1701
  • [Journal-full-title] Schizophrenia bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Schizophr Bull
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; cross-lagged analysis / first episode psychosis / motivation / psychosocial functioning / schizophrenia
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18. Chadman KK: Animal models for autism in 2017 and the consequential implications to drug discovery. Expert Opin Drug Discov; 2017 Dec;12(12):1187-1194

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The core symptoms of ASD vary widely in severity and are often accompanied by other neuropsychiatric disorders.
  • Drug discovery has been challenging because of the lack of understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of ASD as well as the heterogeneity of symptoms and symptom severity.
  • While very little of this work has resulted in drug therapy for the behavioral symptoms of ASD yet, it has increased our knowledge of the biology of ASD that is critical for driving drug discovery and has already provided many new drug targets for investigation.

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  • (PMID = 28971687.001).
  • [ISSN] 1746-045X
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert opinion on drug discovery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Opin Drug Discov
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autism spectrum disorder / animal model / mice / pharmacotherapy / rats / repetitive behavior / social behavior / voles
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19. Bloom GS, Lazo JS, Norambuena A: Reduced brain insulin signaling: A seminal process in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Neuropharmacology; 2017 Sep 29;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The synaptic dysfunction and death of neurons that mediate memory and cognition account together for the behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD).
  • Reduced insulin signaling in the brain is a hallmark of AD patients, even in the absence of systemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes, prompting some researchers to refer to AD as brain-specific, or type 3 diabetes.
  • A key question that arises about this signature feature of AD is "how, if at all, does the brain's impaired ability to utilize insulin contribute to the behavioral deficits associated with AD?
  • " The fact that type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for AD suggests a causative role for impaired insulin responsiveness in AD pathogenesis, but how that might occur at a detailed molecular level had been elusive.
  • Here we review recent findings that mechanistically link soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, the respective building blocks of the amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that accumulate in the brains of AD patients, with neuronal decline that is associated with poor insulin responsiveness and may begin long before AD symptoms become evident.
  • We discuss how Aβ and tau work coordinately to deprive neurons of functionally accessible insulin receptors and dysregulate normal signaling by the protein kinase, mTOR.
  • Finally, we suggest how newly gained knowledge about pathogenic signaling caused by reduced brain insulin signaling might be exploited for improved early detection and therapeutic intervention for AD.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28965829.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-7064
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / RF1 AG051085
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer's disease / Amyloid-β / Insulin / Tau / mTOR
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20. O'Connor CM, Clemson L, Brodaty H, Low LF, Jeon YH, Gitlin LN, Piguet O, Mioshi E: The tailored activity program (TAP) to address behavioral disturbances in frontotemporal dementia: a feasibility and pilot study. Disabil Rehabil; 2017 Oct 15;:1-12

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The tailored activity program (TAP) to address behavioral disturbances in frontotemporal dementia: a feasibility and pilot study.
  • METHODS: The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves working collaboratively with family carers and prescribes personalized activities for behavioral management in people with dementia.
  • Quantitative outcomes showed an overall reduction of behavioral symptoms (F<sub>18.34</sub> = 8.073, p = 0.011) and maintenance of functional performance in the person with dementia (F<sub>18.03</sub> = 0.375, p = 0.548).
  • Service providers should recognize that while people with frontotemporal dementia present with challenging issues, tailored therapies may support their function and reduce their behavioral symptoms.
  • Implications for rehabilitation The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves prescribing personalized activities for behavioral management in dementia.
  • The Tailored Activity Program is an acceptable and feasible intervention approach to address some of the unique behavioral and functional impairments inherent in frontotemporal dementia.

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  • (PMID = 29034719.001).
  • [ISSN] 1464-5165
  • [Journal-full-title] Disability and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Disabil Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Frontotemporal dementia / activities of daily living / behavior / dementia / randomized-controlled trial / tailored activity program
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21. Caçola P, Miller HL, Williamson PO: Behavioral comparisons in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder: A systematic literature review. Res Autism Spectr Disord; 2017 Jun;38:6-18

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Behavioral comparisons in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder: A systematic literature review.
  • While some recent studies suggest that ASD and DCD have similar traits, others show clear behavioral distinctions between the two conditions.
  • The articles included reported more differences than similarities in individuals with ASD and DCD, with clear distinctions for working memory ability, gestural performance, grip selection, and cortical thickness.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Based on the articles reviewed, we conclude that while DCD and ASD share some behavioral symptoms, the symptom profiles of each disorder are unique and separable.
  • We recommend that the evaluation of potential DCD in individuals with ASD be performed systematically and thoroughly, so as to distinguish this co-occurring condition from sensorimotor symptoms associated with ASD.

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  • (PMID = 29057009.001).
  • [ISSN] 1750-9467
  • [Journal-full-title] Research in autism spectrum disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Res Autism Spectr Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / KL2 TR001103
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autism spectrum disorder / behaviors / co-morbidities / cooccurrence / developmental coordination disorder / motor skills / systematic literature review
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22. Skogan AH, Zeiner P, Egeland J, Rohrer-Baumgartner N, Urnes AG, Reichborn-Kjennerud T, Aase H: Inhibition and working memory in young preschool children with symptoms of ADHD and/or oppositional-defiant disorder. Child Neuropsychol; 2014;20(5):607-24
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibition and working memory in young preschool children with symptoms of ADHD and/or oppositional-defiant disorder.
  • BACKGROUND: Early symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) are associated with deficits in cognitive self-regulatory processes or executive functions (EF)s.
  • The present study investigated associations between symptoms of ADHD and/or ODD and two core EFs, inhibition and working memory, in a large nonclinical sample of 3-year old children.
  • Relations between behavioral symptoms and measures of inhibition and working memory were studied both categorically and dimensionally.
  • RESULTS: Children with co-occurring symptoms of ADHD and ODD performed at a significantly lower level than typically developing children in 4 out of 5 EF measures.
  • Symptoms of ADHD, both alone and in combination with ODD, were associated with reduced performance on tests of inhibition in the group comparisons.
  • The associations between test results and behavioral symptoms remained significant after gender and verbal skills had been controlled.
  • CONCLUSION: Young preschoolers show the same pattern of relations between EF and behavioral symptoms of ADHD and/or ODD as previously described in older children diagnosed with ADHD and/or ODD.
  • [MeSH-major] Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / psychology. Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders / psychology. Executive Function. Inhibition (Psychology). Memory, Short-Term

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  • (PMID = 24053105.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-4136
  • [Journal-full-title] Child neuropsychology : a journal on normal and abnormal development in childhood and adolescence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Neuropsychol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 1 UO1 NS047537-01; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / 2 UO1 NS047537-06A1; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / N0-ES75558
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ADHD / Development / Executive functions / ODD / Preschool children
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23. Moghul S, Wilkinson D: Use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease. Expert Rev Neurother; 2001 Sep;1(1):61-9

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Until recently, the management of Alzheimer's disease largely comprised support for the family, nursing care and the use of unlicensed medication to control behavioral disturbances.
  • More recent work on the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on behavioral symptoms, activities of daily living and caregiver burden have also been encouraging.
  • Emerging work indicates their likely efficacy in other dementias (e.g., vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies).

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  • (PMID = 19811047.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-8360
  • [Journal-full-title] Expert review of neurotherapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Expert Rev Neurother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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24. Halbreich U, Freeman EW, Rapkin AJ, Cohen LS, Grubb GS, Bergeron R, Smith L, Mirkin S, Constantine GD: Continuous oral levonorgestrel/ethinyl estradiol for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Contraception; 2012 Jan;85(1):19-27
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. LEVONORGESTREL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Other primary end points were not statistically significant.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Continuous daily LNG 90 mcg/EE 20 mcg was well tolerated and may be useful for managing the physical, psychological and behavioral symptoms and loss of work productivity related to PMDD.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 22067793.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0518
  • [Journal-full-title] Contraception
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Contraception
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00128934
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Contraceptive Agents, Female; 0 / Estrogens; 423D2T571U / Ethinyl Estradiol; 5W7SIA7YZW / Levonorgestrel
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25. Weil ZM, Bowers SL, Dow ER, Nelson RJ: Maternal aggression persists following lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the immune system. Physiol Behav; 2006 Apr 15;87(4):694-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Previous work has suggested that animals can suppress the behavioral symptoms of sickness in order to engage in adaptive behaviors.
  • Further, LPS treatment also altered non-agonistic behavior during the aggression test as indicated by reduced social investigation of the intruder and an increased time spent immobile during the session.
  • These findings suggest that maternal aggression is not suppressed by LPS-evoked immune activation at doses that attenuate other aspects of maternal and social behavior.
  • [MeSH-major] Aggression / physiology. Lactation / immunology. Maternal Behavior / physiology. Reaction Time / immunology. Sick Role

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  • (PMID = 16490223.001).
  • [ISSN] 0031-9384
  • [Journal-full-title] Physiology & behavior
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Physiol. Behav.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH 57535; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH 66144; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / P30 NS 045758
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; W980KJ009P / Corticosterone
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26. Simard M, van Reekum R, Cohen T: A review of the cognitive and behavioral symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci; 2000;12(4):425-50
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A review of the cognitive and behavioral symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies.
  • To clarify the future research agenda in this area, the authors critically appraise the literature on cognitive and behavioral changes in DLB and provide a brief overview of the history of DLB, the main pathological changes, and the findings related to extrapyramidal symptoms and treatment issues.
  • Twenty-one studies on cognition and 47 on behavioral changes in DLB are reviewed.
  • Impairments of working memory and visuospatial functions, visual hallucinations, and depression (or symptoms of depression such as apathy and anxiety) have been identified as early indicators of DLB.
  • However, longitudinal and cross-sectional data are lacking, particularly for different aspects of working memory, visual perception, and non-psychotic behavioral symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 11083160.001).
  • [ISSN] 0895-0172
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Number-of-references] 168
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27. Brown TE, Brams M, Gao J, Gasior M, Childress A: Open-label administration of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate improves executive function impairments and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults. Postgrad Med; 2010 Sep;122(5):7-17
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Open-label administration of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate improves executive function impairments and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults.
  • INTRODUCTION/OBJECTIVE: Executive function (EF) impairment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may account for behavioral symptoms such as poor concentration, impaired working memory, problems in shifting among tasks, and prioritizing and planning complex sets of tasks or completing long-term projects at work or school.
  • METHODS: Executive function behavior was assessed using the Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder Scale (BADDS) during the 4-week open-label dose-optimization phase prior to a 2-period, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of LDX (30-70 mg/day).
  • The ADHD Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS-IV) with adult prompts assessed ADHD symptoms.
  • Change in EF behavioral symptoms was evaluated based on week 4 BADDS total and cluster scores; analyses of shifts from baseline among subjects with BADDS scores < 50, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, and ≥ 70; and scores less than or greater than baseline 90% confidence range (eg, reliably improved or worsened, respectively).
  • [MeSH-major] Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / drug therapy. Central Nervous System Stimulants / administration & dosage. Dextroamphetamine / administration & dosage. Executive Function

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  • (PMID = 20861583.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-9260
  • [Journal-full-title] Postgraduate medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postgrad Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00697515
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Stimulants; SJT761GEGS / Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate; TZ47U051FI / Dextroamphetamine
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28. Nag N, Ward B, Berger-Sweeney JE: Nutritional factors in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Neurosci Biobehav Rev; 2009 Apr;33(4):586-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Environmental factors such as nutrition and housing can influence behavioral and anatomical characteristics of several neurological disorders, including Rett syndrome (RTT).
  • While direct genetic intervention in humans is impossible at this time, motor and cognitive deficits in RTT may be ameliorated through manipulations of epigenetic/environmental factors.
  • Recent work in a mouse model of RTT shows that enhancing maternal nutrition through choline supplementation improves both anatomical and behavioral symptoms in the mutant offspring.

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  • (PMID = 18479749.001).
  • [ISSN] 0149-7634
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosci Biobehav Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / Howard Hughes Medical Institute / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2; N91BDP6H0X / Choline; N9YNS0M02X / Acetylcholine
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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29. Herring A, Blome M, Ambrée O, Sachser N, Paulus W, Keyvani K: Reduction of cerebral oxidative stress following environmental enrichment in mice with Alzheimer-like pathology. Brain Pathol; 2010 Jan;20(1):166-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Additionally, recent work in our lab demonstrated that cognitive and physical stimulation (termed environmental enrichment) counteracts amyloid beta pathology, neurovascular dysfunction and behavioral symptoms in mice with Alzheimer-like disease.

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  • (PMID = 19134003.001).
  • [ISSN] 1750-3639
  • [Journal-full-title] Brain pathology (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Brain Pathol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amyloid beta-Peptides; 0 / Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor; 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Inflammation Mediators; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspases
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30. Barry M, Reschly AL: Longitudinal predictors of high school completion. Sch Psychol Q; 2012 Jun;27(2):74-84

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Model A, which included the Behavioral Symptoms Index, School Problems composite, Iowa Tests of Basic Skills battery, and teacher ratings of student work habits, best predicted female and African American dropouts.

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  • [Copyright] (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
  • (PMID = 22774782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1939-1560
  • [Journal-full-title] School psychology quarterly : the official journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sch Psychol Q
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Delfino JP, Barragán E, Botella C, Braun S, Bridler R, Camussi E, Chafrat V, Lott P, Mohr C, Moragrega I, Papagno C, Sanchez S, Seifritz E, Soler C, Stassen HH: Quantifying insufficient coping behavior under chronic stress: a cross-cultural study of 1,303 students from Italy, Spain and Argentina. Psychopathology; 2015;48(4):230-9
Zurich Open Access Repository and Archive. Full text from .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In fact, chronic stress increasingly dominates modern work conditions and can affect nearly every system of the human body, as suggested by physical, cognitive, affective and behavioral symptoms.
  • The data analysis relied on 2 self-report questionnaires: the Coping Strategies Inventory (COPE) for the assessment of coping behavior and the Zurich Health Questionnaire which assesses consumption behavior and general health dimensions.

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  • [Copyright] © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 25967599.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-033X
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychopathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychopathology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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32. Kim TW, Kang HS, Park JK, Lee SJ, Baek SB, Kim CJ: Voluntary wheel running ameliorates symptoms of MK-801-induced schizophrenia in mice. Mol Med Rep; 2014 Dec;10(6):2924-30
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Voluntary wheel running ameliorates symptoms of MK-801-induced schizophrenia in mice.
  • In the present study, we investigated in vivo the effects of voluntary wheel running on behavioral symptoms associated with NMDA receptor expression, using MK‑801‑induced schizophrenic mice.
  • For the assessment of behavioral symptoms affecting locomotion, social interaction and spatial working memory, the open‑field, social interaction and Morris water maze tests were conducted.
  • MK‑801 injection for 14 days induced schizophrenia‑like behavioral abnormalities with decreased expression of the NMDA receptor and BDNF in the brains of mice.
  • The results indicated that free access to voluntary wheel running for 2 weeks alleviated schizophrenia‑like behavioral abnormalities and increased the expression of NMDA receptor and BDNF, comparable to the effects of aripiprazole treatment.
  • In the present study, the results suggest that NMDA receptor hypofunctioning induced schizophrenia‑like behaviors, and that voluntary wheel running was effective in reducing these symptoms by increasing NMDA receptor and BDNF expression, resulting in an improvement of disease related behavioral deficits.

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  • (PMID = 25323073.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-3004
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular medicine reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Med Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; 6LR8C1B66Q / Dizocilpine Maleate
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33. Cunningham J, Williams KN: A case study of resistiveness to care and elderspeak. Res Theory Nurs Pract; 2007;21(1):45-56
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • This case study evaluated behavioral responses of a nursing home resident with dementia to nursing staff use of elderspeak communication (infantilizing speech).
  • Limitations include the use of a convenient case study sample with inability to control time of day, medications, different care activities, staff characteristics, and other factors.
  • Knowledge about communication in dementia care may inform nursing care practices to overcome behavioral symptoms such as RTC and improve quality of life for individuals with dementia and working conditions for nursing staff.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Communication. Dementia. Nurse-Patient Relations. Nursing Staff / psychology. Treatment Refusal / psychology

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  • (PMID = 17378464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-6577
  • [Journal-full-title] Research and theory for nursing practice
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Res Theory Nurs Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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34. Wuthrich VM, Johnco CJ, Wetherell JL: Differences in anxiety and depression symptoms: comparison between older and younger clinical samples. Int Psychogeriatr; 2015 Sep;27(9):1523-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Differences in anxiety and depression symptoms: comparison between older and younger clinical samples.
  • BACKGROUND: Anxiety and depression symptoms change over the lifespan and older adults use different terms to describe their mental health, contributing to under identification of anxiety and depression in older adults.
  • To date, research has not examined these differences in younger and older samples with comorbid anxiety and depression.
  • Older adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) reported less worry about interpersonal relationships and work/school than younger adults, however, there were no differences between age groups for behavioral symptoms endorsed.
  • Finally, older and younger adults differed in their descriptions of symptoms with older adults describing anxiety as feeling stressed and tense, while younger adults described anxiety as feeling anxious, worried or nervous.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians need to assess symptoms broadly to avoid missing the presence of anxiety and mood disorders especially in older adults.


35. Farrace D, Tommasi M, Casadio C, Verrotti A: Parenting stress evaluation and behavioral syndromes in a group of pediatric patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav; 2013 Oct;29(1):222-7
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stress.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Parenting stress evaluation and behavioral syndromes in a group of pediatric patients with epilepsy.
  • The aim of the present work was to measure the amount of stress in parents of children with epilepsy and to determine whether and how parenting stress is linked to behavioral symptoms of the children.
  • Parenting stress was measured with the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) and behavioral symptoms with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).
  • Epilepsy caused a high level of parenting stress and of problematic behaviors since the behavioral symptoms predicting the degree of parenting stress significantly differed between healthy children and children with epilepsy.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms / etiology. Epilepsy / complications. Parent-Child Relations. Parenting / psychology. Stress, Psychological / etiology

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  • [Copyright] © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 24034672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1525-5069
  • [Journal-full-title] Epilepsy & behavior : E&B
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Epilepsy Behav
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Behavioral syndrome / Epilepsy / Parenting stress / Pediatric patients
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36. Amore M: Partial androgen deficiency and neuropsychiatric symptoms in aging men. J Endocrinol Invest; 2005;28(11 Suppl Proceedings):49-54
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Partial androgen deficiency and neuropsychiatric symptoms in aging men.
  • The partial androgen deficiency of aging males (PADAM) is responsible for a variety of behavioral symptoms, such as weakness, fatigue, decreased libido, depressive mood, lack of motivation and energy, lower psychological vitality, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, decreased work and sport performances, difficulty in concentrating, memory impairment and low dominance.
  • Psychological and behavioral aspects of PADAM overlap with signs and symptoms of major depression.
  • The etiology of the behavioral symptoms of PADAM is multifactorial, being the result of the interaction of biological and social changes, and of the personal ability to adapt to the numerous individual and social changes that take place during mid-life transition.

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  • (PMID = 16760626.001).
  • [ISSN] 0391-4097
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of endocrinological investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Endocrinol. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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37. Gilman JT, Tuchman RF: Autism and associated behavioral disorders: pharmacotherapeutic intervention. Ann Pharmacother; 1995 Jan;29(1):47-56
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Autism and associated behavioral disorders: pharmacotherapeutic intervention.
  • DATA SYNTHESIS: Autism and PDDs are severe developmental disabilities defined by behavioral criteria.
  • Behavioral manifestations of patients with autism include core deficits in social interaction, communication, and imaginative activities, with a restricted repertoire of activities and interests.
  • The role of pharmacotherapy in the management of autism and PDDs is to ameliorate behavioral symptoms that interfere with the patient's ability to participate in educational, social, work, and family systems.
  • Present pharmacotherapeutic intervention seeks to resolve behavioral symptoms.
  • Treatment of autism and PDDs requires appropriate delineation of the behaviors and neurobiologic disorders associated with each patient.

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  • (PMID = 7711345.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 88
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38. Kokubo K, Suzuki K, Hattori N, Miyai I, Mori E: Executive Dysfunction in Patients with Putaminal Hemorrhage. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis; 2015 Sep;24(9):1978-85

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Although putaminal lesions presumably lead to cognitive and behavioral changes, studies on frontal lobe dysfunctions after putaminal stroke are scarce.
  • METHODS: Cognitive functions, including various aspects of frontal lobe functions, were systematically assessed in 15 patients with left- or right-sided putaminal hemorrhage 2 months after the onset and compared with healthy controls.
  • RESULTS: Patients did not have signs of aphasia, apraxia, or spatial neglect.
  • They performed significantly worse on tests of frontal lobe function, including Letter-Number Sequencing (U = 22, P < .001), lexical fluency (U = 30, P < .001), and motor series subtest (U = 45, P = .004) of the Frontal Assessment Battery.
  • None showed behavioral impairment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Isolated putaminal hemorrhage causes modest frontal lobe dysfunction without behavioral symptoms.
  • [MeSH-major] Cognition Disorders / diagnosis. Cognition Disorders / etiology. Executive Function / physiology. Putaminal Hemorrhage / complications

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 26187790.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8511
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Putaminal hemorrhage / Wisconsin Card Sorting Test / executive dysfunction / the frontal–subcortical circuits / working memory
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39. Marinelli L, Piccardo A, Mori L, Morbelli S, Girtler N, Castaldi A, Picco A, Trompetto C, Ghilardi MF, Abbruzzese G, Nobili F: Orbitofrontal (18) F-DOPA Uptake and Movement Preparation in Parkinson's Disease. Parkinsons Dis; 2015;2015:180940

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In Parkinson's disease (PD) degeneration of mesocortical dopaminergic projections may determine cognitive and behavioral symptoms.
  • Choice reaction time task is related to attention, working memory, and goal-directed behavior.
  • The aim of this study is to characterize the role of dopamine on the cognitive processes that precede movement in a reaction time paradigm in PD.
  • They performed multiple-choice reaction time task with the right upper limb and brain (18)F-DOPA PET/CT scan.
  • A significant inverse correlation was highlighted between average reaction time and (18)F-DOPA uptake in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex.
  • No correlations were found between reaction time and PD disease severity or between reaction time and (18)F-DOPA uptake in controls.
  • Our study shows that in PD, but not in controls, reaction time is inversely related to the levels of dopamine in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex.

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  • (PMID = 26171275.001).
  • [ISSN] 2090-8083
  • [Journal-full-title] Parkinson's disease
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Parkinsons Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4480935
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40. Gotts SJ, Saad ZS, Jo HJ, Wallace GL, Cox RW, Martin A: The perils of global signal regression for group comparisons: a case study of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Front Hum Neurosci; 2013;7:356

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • We have previously argued from a theoretical basis that the standard practice of regression of the Global Signal from the fMRI time series in functional connectivity studies is ill advised, particularly when comparing groups of participants.
  • Using the prior theoretical work to formulate predictions, we show:.
  • (1) rather than simply altering the mean or range of correlation values amongst pairs of brain regions, Global Signal Regression systematically alters the rank ordering of values in addition to introducing negative values, (2) it leads to a reversal in the direction of group correlation differences relative to other preprocessing approaches, with a higher incidence of both long-range and local correlation differences that favor the Autism Spectrum Disorder group, (3) the strongest group differences under other preprocessing approaches are the ones most altered by Global Signal Regression, and (4) locations showing group differences no longer agree with those showing correlations with behavioral symptoms within the Autism Spectrum Disorder group.

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  • (PMID = 23874279.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in human neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front Hum Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3709423
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; GCOR / artifact / functional connectivity / global correlation / resting-state fMRI / typically developing
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41. Ahmed SH, Kenny PJ: Cracking the molecular code of cocaine addiction. ILAR J; 2011;52(3):309-20
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. COCAINE .

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  • Cocaine addiction is a behavioral disorder defined by behavioral symptoms that set it apart from nondisordered forms of drug use.
  • Here we review evidence in rats (the most frequently used animal model in the field) that it is possible, after extended (but not after limited) access to cocaine for self-administration, to selectively induce some of these behaviors: gradual escalation of cocaine intake, enhanced motivation for the drug despite increased costs (or negative consequences), and increased sensitivity to drug- and stress-primed craving-like behavior.
  • Animals with extended drug use also present selective neurocognitive deficits (e.g., compromised working memory) that may impair their ability to regulate cocaine intake.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Cocaine.
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  • (PMID = 23382145.001).
  • [ISSN] 1930-6180
  • [Journal-full-title] ILAR journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ILAR J
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA025983
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine
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42. Linssen AM, Vuurman EF, Sambeth A, Riedel WJ: Methylphenidate produces selective enhancement of declarative memory consolidation in healthy volunteers. Psychopharmacology (Berl); 2012 Jun;221(4):611-9
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHYLPHENIDATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Besides reducing behavioral symptoms, it improves their cognitive function.
  • OBJECTIVE: In the current study, the possible enhancing effects of three doses of methylphenidate on declarative and working memory, attention, response inhibition and planning were investigated in healthy volunteers.
  • Cognitive performance testing included a word learning test as a measure of declarative memory, a spatial working memory test, a set-shifting test, a stop signal test and a computerized version of the Tower of London planning test.
  • Methylphenidate also improved set shifting and stopped signal task performance but did not affect spatial working memory or planning.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Memory.
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  • (PMID = 22169884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-2072
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychopharmacology (Berl.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Stimulants; 0 / Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors; 207ZZ9QZ49 / Methylphenidate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3360847
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43. Cunningham J, Yonkers KA, O'Brien S, Eriksson E: Update on research and treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Harv Rev Psychiatry; 2009;17(2):120-37
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Many women in their reproductive years experience some mood, behavioral. or physical symptoms in the week prior to menses.
  • Variability exists in the level of symptom burden in that some women experience mild symptoms, whereas a small minority experience severe and debilitating symptoms.
  • For an estimated 5%-8% of premenopausal women, work or social functioning are affected by severe premenstrual syndrome.
  • Among women who suffer from PMDD, mood and behavioral symptoms such as irritability, depressed mood, tension, and labile mood dominate.
  • Recent evidence suggests that individual sensitivity to cyclical variations in levels of gonadal hormones may predispose certain women to experience these mood, behavioral, and somatic symptoms.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Premenstrual Syndrome.
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  • (PMID = 19373620.001).
  • [ISSN] 1465-7309
  • [Journal-full-title] Harvard review of psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Harv Rev Psychiatry
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH072955-02; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH072955; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH072955-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 312
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS293835; NLM/ PMC3098121
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44. Gomarus HK, Wijers AA, Minderaa RB, Althaus M: ERP correlates of selective attention and working memory capacities in children with ADHD and/or PDD-NOS. Clin Neurophysiol; 2009 Jan;120(1):60-72
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  • [Title] ERP correlates of selective attention and working memory capacities in children with ADHD and/or PDD-NOS.
  • OBJECTIVE: We examined whether children (8-11 years) diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) showing primarily hyperactive behavior, differed in selective attention and working memory (WM) abilities.
  • METHODS: Healthy controls and children with ADHD, PDD-NOS or symptoms of both disorders (PDD/HD) (n=15 in each group) carried out a visual selective memory search task while their EEG was recorded from which event-related potentials were derived.
  • RESULTS: Compared to the control group, all patient groups made more omissions while hyperactive children also exhibited more false alarms.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results point to less efficient WM-functioning in all patient groups.
  • Whereas the clinical groups differed from each other at the behavioral level as measured by questionnaires, no distinction between the clinical groups could be made with respect to performance or ERP measures of WM capacity and selective attention.
  • SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that a possible differentiation in selectivity and working memory capacities between PDD-NOS and ADHD is hard to find.
  • [MeSH-minor] Analysis of Variance. Child. Electroencephalography / methods. Humans. Photic Stimulation. Reaction Time / physiology. Surveys and Questionnaires. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 19056313.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-8952
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Neurophysiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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45. Pinheiro D: [Anticonvulsant mood stabilizers in the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)]. Encephale; 2008 Sep;34(4):409-15
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  • [Title] [Anticonvulsant mood stabilizers in the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)].
  • INTRODUCTION: Dementia, besides the dominant cognitive disorders that define it, is associated with behavioral disturbances, the consequences of which are, on various levels, a determining factor for the handling of these patients.
  • The treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms is essential and although, to date, no therapeutic solution is satisfactory, it is necessary to look for an alternative to the neuroleptics usually employed, which raise real problems of tolerance in this geriatric population.
  • The purpose of this review of the literature is to assess the interest and the limits of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers (carbamazepine, valproic acid, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, oxcarbazepine) in the treatment of the so-called "noncognitive" symptoms of dementia.
  • Their mechanism of action in mood disorders is not well known, but it would appear to be via the modulation of glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission that anticonvulsants might reduce behavioral symptoms in demented patients.
  • METHODS: The method employed in this work was a systematic bibliographic review, in which only the double-blind placebo-controlled studies or the clinically detailed enough open-labelled studies using validated scales were retained.
  • RESULTS: Among these medications, only carbamazepine demonstrated its efficacy in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in controlled studies, notably that of Tariot et al.
  • However, among the five controlled studies that have been published [Curr Ther Res 62 (2001) 51-67; Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 9 (2001) 58-66; Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 17 (2002) 579-585; Curr Alzheimer Res 2 (2005) 553-558 and Am J Geraitr Psychiatry 13 (2005) 942-945], none confirmed its efficacy on these symptoms.
  • Regarding its tolerability in the geriatric population, no notable major side effect was reported (haematologic and hepatic effects are not more frequent than in the general population), except possible excessive sedation.
  • DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Finally, although we all know that antipsychotics should no longer be prescribed in the elderly, the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia remains a difficult problem, considering the lack of a real alternative to these medications.
  • Anticonvulsant mood stabilizers are an interesting solution but none of them, other than carbamazepine, which did, but which is not better tolerated than the usual drugs in this population - was able to prove its efficacy in this indication.

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  • (PMID = 18922244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0013-7006
  • [Journal-full-title] L'Encéphale
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Encephale
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amines; 0 / Anticonvulsants; 0 / Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; 0 / Triazines; 0H73WJJ391 / topiramate; 30237-26-4 / Fructose; 33CM23913M / Carbamazepine; 56-12-2 / gamma-Aminobutyric Acid; 614OI1Z5WI / Valproic Acid; 6CW7F3G59X / gabapentin; U3H27498KS / lamotrigine; VZI5B1W380 / oxcarbazepine
  • [Number-of-references] 48
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46. Rousseau C, Benoit M, Gauthier MF, Lacroix L, Alain N, Rojas MV, Moran A, Bourassa D: Classroom drama therapy program for immigrant and refugee adolescents: a pilot study. Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry; 2007 Jul;12(3):451-65
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  • This evaluative study assesses the effects of a school drama therapy program for immigrant and refugee adolescents designed to prevent emotional and behavioral problems and to enhance school performance.
  • The self-report and teacher's forms of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire were used to assess emotional and behavioral symptoms.
  • At the end of the program, although there were no reported improvement in self-esteem or emotional and behavioral symptoms, the adolescents in the experimental group reported lower mean levels of impairment by symptoms than those in the control group, when baseline data were controlled for.
  • This drama therapy program appears to be a promising way of working preventively and in a nonstigmatizing manner with adolescents who have been exposed to diverse forms of adversity, among which are war and violence.

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  • (PMID = 17953131.001).
  • [ISSN] 1359-1045
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical child psychology and psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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47. Craufurd D, Thompson JC, Snowden JS: Behavioral changes in Huntington Disease. Neuropsychiatry Neuropsychol Behav Neurol; 2001 Oct-Dec;14(4):219-26
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  • [Title] Behavioral changes in Huntington Disease.
  • OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to gain a better understanding of behavioral abnormalities in Huntington disease (HD) and to develop a method for reliably assessing these changes.
  • BACKGROUND: Behavioral changes are a central feature of HD and often cause considerable distress and difficulty to patients and their relatives.
  • METHODS: One hundred thirty-four patients with HD were assessed using the Problem Behaviors Assessment for Huntington Disease (PBA-HD), an instrument for rating the presence, severity and frequency of behavioral abnormalities in HD.
  • RESULTS: The findings confirm that behavioral problems are common among patients with HD.
  • The most common symptoms were loss of energy and initiative, poor perseverance and quality of work, impaired judgment, poor self-care and emotional blunting.
  • Affective symptoms such as depression, anxiety and irritability occurred in around half the patients studied.
  • Psychotic symptoms (hallucinations and delusions) were rarely reported.
  • Factor analysis distinguished three clusters of behavioral symptoms, which were interpreted respectively as reflecting Apathy, Depression and Irritability.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that certain behavioral changes are fundamental to the progression of HD, whereas others have a more complex relationship to the disease process.
  • The findings have implications for the choice of behavioral measures used to evaluate efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

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  • [CommentIn] Cogn Behav Neurol. 2003 Mar;16(1):82 [14765005.001]
  • (PMID = 11725215.001).
  • [ISSN] 0894-878X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropsychiatry, neuropsychology, and behavioral neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropsychiatry Neuropsychol Behav Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. Matsuura N, Ishitobi M, Arai S, Kawamura K, Asano M, Inohara K, Fujioka T, Narimoto T, Wada Y, Hiratani M, Kosaka H: Effects of methylphenidate in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a near-infrared spectroscopy study with CANTAB®. Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health; 2014;8(1):273

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: A wide range of evidence supports the methylphenidate (MPH)-induced enhancement of prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning and improvements in behavioral symptoms in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Although working memory (WM) has been hypothesized to be impaired in patients with ADHD, no pharmacological studies have examined visuospatial WM (VSWM) with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS).
  • RESULTS: No significant differences were found in the scores for both spatial working memory (SWM) and score of spatial span (SSP) tasks between the MPH-off and MPH-on conditions.
  • Although the MPH-induced change on behavior may or may not be obvious, NIRS measurements might be useful for assessing the psychological effects of MPH even when performance changes were not observed in the cognitive tasks.

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  • (PMID = 25606052.001).
  • [ISSN] 1753-2000
  • [Journal-full-title] Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4298959
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) / Cambridge automated neuropsychological testing battery (CANTAB®) / Executive function (EF) / Methylphenidate (MPH) / Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) / Visuospatial working memory (VSWM)
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49. Bouvrais-Veret C, Weiss S, Hanoun N, Andrieux A, Schweitzer A, Job D, Hamon M, Giros B, Martres MP: Microtubule-associated STOP protein deletion triggers restricted changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission. J Neurochem; 2008 Feb;104(3):745-56
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Mice invalidated for the STOP gene display phenotype reminiscent of some schizophrenic-like symptoms, such as behavioral disturbances, dopamine (DA) hyper-reactivity, and possible hypoglutamatergia, partly improved by antipsychotic treatment.
  • In the present work, we examined potential alterations in some DAergic key proteins and behaviors in STOP knockout mice.
  • Whereas the densities of the DA transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter and the D(1) receptor were not modified, the densities of the D(2) and D(3) receptors were decreased in some DAergic regions in mutant versus wild-type mice.
  • The DA uptake was decreased in accumbic synaptosomes, but not significantly altered in striatal synaptosomes.

  • HAL archives ouvertes. Full text from .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. COCAINE .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DOPAMINE .
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  • [CommentIn] J Neurochem. 2012 Apr;121(1):1-3 [22145979.001]
  • (PMID = 18199119.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-4159
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neurochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors; 0 / Microtubule-Associated Proteins; 0 / Mtap6 protein, mouse; 0 / Receptors, Dopamine; 0 / Slc18a2 protein, mouse; 0 / Vesicular Monoamine Transport Proteins; EC 1.14.16.2 / Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase; I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
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50. Ciccia RM, Langlais PJ: An examination of the synergistic interaction of ethanol and thiamine deficiency in the development of neurological signs and long-term cognitive and memory impairments. Alcohol Clin Exp Res; 2000 May;24(5):622-34
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ETHANOL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • METHODS: The acute neurological and long-term behavioral consequences of combined chronic (32 weeks) ethanol consumption (20% v/v in drinking water) and three separate 4-week long episodes of dietary thiamine deficiency (ET/TD) versus ethanol (ET) or thiamine deficiency (TD) treatments alone were examined in male Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks at the start of treatment.
  • None of the ET animals displayed any neurological or behavioral symptoms during treatment.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the interaction of chronic ethanol consumption and bouts of TD is both domain specific and not always synergistic.
  • Learning and reference memory appear to be sensitive to a synergistic interaction of ET and TD, whereas short-term working memory disturbances are most affected by ET and neurological symptoms are most associated with TD.
  • Furthermore, neither the presence of neurological symptoms nor blood ethanol concentrations appear to be good predictors of learning and memory deficits.

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  • (PMID = 10832903.001).
  • [ISSN] 0145-6008
  • [Journal-full-title] Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / AA10473
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Depressants; 3K9958V90M / Ethanol
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51. Peters RK, Benson H, Porter D: Daily relaxation response breaks in a working population: I. Effects on self-reported measures of health, performance, and well-being. Am J Public Health; 1977 Oct;67(10):946-53
The Lens. Cited by Patents in .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Daily relaxation response breaks in a working population: I. Effects on self-reported measures of health, performance, and well-being.
  • Differences between the mean changes in Groups A vs C reached statistical significance (p < 0.05) on four of the five indices: Symptoms, Illness Days, Performance, and Sociability-Satisfaction.
  • Improvements on the Happiness-Unhappiness Index were not significantly different among the three groups.
  • Somatic symptoms and performance responded with less practice of the relaxation response than did behavioral symptoms and measures of well-being. (Am. J.

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  • (PMID = 333957.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-0036
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1653745
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52. Bikic A, Leckman JF, Lindschou J, Christensen TØ, Dalsgaard S: Cognitive computer training in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus no intervention: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials; 2015 Oct 24;16:480
ClinicalTrials.gov. clinical trials - ClinicalTrials.gov .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention and impulsivity and/or hyperactivity and a range of cognitive dysfunctions.
  • Pharmacological treatment may be beneficial; however, many affected individuals continue to have difficulties with cognitive functions despite medical treatment, and up to 30 % do not respond to pharmacological treatment.
  • Lately, several trials have shown promising results for cognitive computer training, often referred to as cognitive training, which focuses on particular parts of cognition, mostly on the working memory or attention but with poor generalization of training on other cognitive functions and functional outcome.
  • METHODS/DESIGN: This multicenter randomized clinical superiority trial aims to investigate the effect of "ACTIVATE™," a computer program designed to improve a range of cognitive skills and ADHD symptoms.
  • Outcome measures will assess cognitive functions, symptoms, and behavioral and functional measures before and after the 8 weeks of training and in a 12- and 24-week follow-up.
  • Cognitive training has the potential to reduce cognitive dysfunctions and to become a new treatment option, which can promote a more normal neural development in young children with ADHD and thus reduce cognitive dysfunctions and symptoms.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adolescent Behavior. Attention. Child. Child Behavior. Clinical Protocols. Denmark. Female. Humans. Male. Memory, Short-Term. Research Design. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 26499057.001).
  • [ISSN] 1745-6215
  • [Journal-full-title] Trials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Trials
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT01752530
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4619562
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53. Burgunder JM, Guttman M, Perlman S, Goodman N, van Kammen DP, Goodman L: An International Survey-based Algorithm for the Pharmacologic Treatment of Chorea in Huntington's Disease. PLoS Curr; 2011 Aug 30;3:RRN1260

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The HD chorea research literature fails to address the indications for drug treatment, drug selection, drug dosing and side effect profiles, management of inadequate response to a single drug, and preferred drug when behavioral symptoms comorbid to chorea are present.
  • Survey results showed that patient stigma, physical injury, gait instability, work interference, and disturbed sleep were indications for a drug treatment trial.
  • However, the experts did not agree on first choice of chorea drug, with the majority of experts in Europe favoring an antipsychotic drug (APD), and a near equal split in first choice between an APD and tetrabenazine (TBZ) among experts from North America and Australia.

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  • (PMID = 21975581.002).
  • [ISSN] 2157-3999
  • [Journal-full-title] PLoS currents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS Curr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3166256
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54. Rhodes SM, Riby DM, Matthews K, Coghill DR: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and Williams syndrome: shared behavioral and neuropsychological profiles. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol; 2011 Jan;33(1):147-56
COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and Williams syndrome: shared behavioral and neuropsychological profiles.
  • We compared verbally matched attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Williams syndrome (WS), and typically developing individuals (N = 19 each group) on behavioral symptoms (Conners ADHD rating scale) and neuropsychological functioning.
  • Children with WS scored within the abnormal range and did not differ in severity from ADHD children on the Conners Oppositionality, Cognitive Problems/Inattention, Hyperactivity, and ADHD Index subscales.
  • The WS and ADHD groups also showed similar patterns of neuropsychological functioning, particularly in working memory (WM) strategy use and delayed short-term memory (STM).
  • The findings may have clinical implications for the management of individuals with WS, highlighting the potential significance of behavioral, educational, and pharmacological strategies and treatments known to be useful in the treatment of children with ADHD for individuals with WS.
  • [MeSH-major] Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / complications. Behavioral Symptoms / etiology. Cognition Disorders / etiology. Neuropsychological Tests. Williams Syndrome / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Analysis of Variance. Child. Executive Function / physiology. Female. Humans. Male. Surveys and Questionnaires. Verbal Behavior / physiology. Young Adult


55. Castner SA, Arriza JL, Roberts JC, Mrzljak L, Christian EP, Williams GV: Reversal of ketamine-induced working memory impairments by the GABAAalpha2/3 agonist TPA023. Biol Psychiatry; 2010 May 15;67(10):998-1001
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. KETAMINE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reversal of ketamine-induced working memory impairments by the GABAAalpha2/3 agonist TPA023.
  • BACKGROUND: Ketamine has been used to model cognitive and behavioral symptoms of schizophrenia.
  • Current hypotheses state that inadequate glutamatergic transmission in schizophrenia leads to a deficiency in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic inhibitory mechanisms and treatment with a GABA type A receptor subunits alpha2/alpha3 (GABA(Aalpha2/3)) modulator improved working memory performance in a preliminary study in patients.
  • Here, we used ketamine to impair spatial working memory and disrupt behavior to examine the capacity for the GABA(Aalpha2/3) agonist 7-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-6-(2-ethyl-2H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ylmethoxy)-3-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine (TPA023) to reverse these symptoms.
  • Behavioral observations were acquired at approximately 5 minutes, and spatial delayed response performance was tested at 15 minutes postinjection.
  • RESULTS: Ketamine produced a profound impairment in spatial working memory in association with the emergence of hallucinatory-like behaviors.
  • TPA023 at all doses blocked ketamine's cognitive-impairing ability but did not influence the behavioral symptoms.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Acute GABA(Aalpha2/3) agonist administration reverses the working memory deficits induced by ketamine in primates.
  • This finding indicates that the consequences of N-methyl-D-aspartate deficiency on the function of prefrontal circuits involved in working memory can be completely overcome by acute enhancement of GABA signaling.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20189164.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2402
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R01 MH 65552
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / 7-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-6-(2-ethyl-2H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ylmethoxy)-3-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-triazolo(4,3-b)pyridazine; 0 / GABA-A Receptor Agonists; 0 / Pyridazines; 0 / Triazoles; 690G0D6V8H / Ketamine
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56. Greenberg BD, Askland KD, Carpenter LL: The evolution of deep brain stimulation for neuropsychiatric disorders. Front Biosci; 2008;13:4638-48
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  • Thus, therapeutic effectiveness can be enhanced and stimulation-related side effects minimized during long-term patient management.
  • Thus far, work in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the first psychiatric condition studied using modern DBS devices, has shown consistently positive results across multiple small-scale studies.
  • Work in treatment-resistant Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) also suggests therapeutic potential in preliminary studies, generating cautious optimism for this indication.
  • Further development of DBS for these and other illnesses with primarily behavioral symptoms will require thoughtful collaboration among multiple disciplines.

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  • (PMID = 18508535.001).
  • [ISSN] 1093-9946
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front. Biosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antidepressive Agents
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57. Dodel R, Belger M, Reed C, Wimo A, Jones RW, Happich M, Argimon JM, Bruno G, Vellas B, Haro JM: Determinants of societal costs in Alzheimer's disease: GERAS study baseline results. Alzheimers Dement; 2015 Aug;11(8):933-45
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  • BACKGROUND: To identify the main factors associated with societal costs of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in community-dwelling patients across three European countries.
  • Assessments included patients' cognition, activities of daily living (ADLs) and behavioral symptoms, and caregiver burden.
  • Cost calculations (2010) from the societal perspective were based on patient/caregiver resource use.
  • RESULTS: Mean monthly costs per patient differed for France (€1881), Germany (€2349), and the UK (€2016), with informal care costs accounting for 50% to 61%.
  • Independent factors associated with costs across all countries were ADL total score, patient living arrangements, caregiver working status, and caregiver burden (all P < .05).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Several patient and caregiver factors, including factors associated with informal care, should be included when evaluating care options for patients with AD.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 25846298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-5279
  • [Journal-full-title] Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Alzheimers Dement
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Observational Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer's disease / Cost of illness / Dementia / Factors / Health care costs
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58. Detrait ER, Danis B, Lamberty Y, Foerch P: Peripheral administration of an anti-TNF-α receptor fusion protein counteracts the amyloid induced elevation of hippocampal TNF-α levels and memory deficits in mice. Neurochem Int; 2014 Jun;72:10-3
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  • We investigated if systemic administration of an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) biologic medication clinically validated for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), TNF receptor 2 fused to a Fc domain (TNFR2:Fc), could ameliorate the behavioral symptoms and decrease neuroinflammation in a non-transgenic mouse model mimicking some hallmarks of the disease.
  • Seven days after a single intracebroventricular (icv) injection of aggregated amyloid beta25-35 (9nmoles), mice displayed significant cognitive deficit in spontaneous alternation (working memory) and inhibitory avoidance (long-term memory) tasks.
  • Measurement of hippocampal TNF-α levels by ELISA after behavioral assessment showed significant elevation in animals injected with amyloid beta25-35 relative to animals injected with control peptide.
  • [MeSH-minor] Amyloid beta-Peptides / antagonists & inhibitors. Amyloid beta-Peptides / toxicity. Animals. Avoidance Learning / drug effects. Memory, Short-Term / drug effects. Mice. Peptide Fragments / antagonists & inhibitors. Peptide Fragments / toxicity. Psychomotor Performance / drug effects. Recombinant Fusion Proteins / pharmacology. TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 2 / genetics. TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 2 / pharmacology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 24726770.001).
  • [ISSN] 1872-9754
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurochemistry international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurochem. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amyloid; 0 / Amyloid beta-Peptides; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor; 0 / Recombinant Fusion Proteins; 0 / TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 2; 0 / amyloid beta-protein (25-35)
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer disease / Biologics / Neuroinflammation / TNF-α
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59. Louis ED: Behavioral symptoms associated with essential tremor. Adv Neurol; 2005;96:284-90
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  • [Title] Behavioral symptoms associated with essential tremor.
  • Further work is needed to define the extent of the nonmotor manifestations, their presence or absence in the predisease state, and their progression over time.
  • [MeSH-major] Behavioral Symptoms / etiology. Essential Tremor / complications

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  • (PMID = 16383227.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-3952
  • [Journal-full-title] Advances in neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adv Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS39422; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / R01 NS42859
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 37
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60. Morley JE: Testosterone and behavior. Clin Geriatr Med; 2003 Aug;19(3):605-16
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. TESTOSTERONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • A number of authors have tried to describe a set of behavioral symptoms associated with the andropause.
  • In older men testosterone enhances spatial memory and possibly verbal and working memory.
  • Table 2 summarizes the putative behavioral effects of testosterone.
  • [Table: see text] There is a clear need for better designed large-scale behavioral studies to determine the effects of testosterone in older men and women.

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  • (PMID = 14567011.001).
  • [ISSN] 0749-0690
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in geriatric medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin. Geriatr. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 3XMK78S47O / Testosterone
  • [Number-of-references] 99
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61. Ueno K, Togashi H, Yoshioka M: [Behavioral and pharmacological studies of juvenile stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats as an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder]. Nihon Shinkei Seishin Yakurigaku Zasshi; 2003 Feb;23(1):47-55
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. METHYLPHENIDATE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Behavioral and pharmacological studies of juvenile stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats as an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder].
  • The present study was undertaken to evaluate juvenile stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) as an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD).
  • Anxiety-related behavior assessed by elevated plus-maze as an index of impulsivity, the entries into open arms and the spent time in the open arms of SHRSP were significantly higher than those of WKY.
  • Spontaneous alternation behavior requiring attention and working memory in the Y-maze was significantly impaired in male, but not female, SHRSP when compared with sex-matched WKY.
  • Hippocampal long-term potentiation formation, a cellular model of learning and memory, was not impaired in SHRSP.
  • Methylphenidate, a first choice psychostimulant for AD/HD, significantly alleviated the hyperactivity in SHRSP.
  • However, intense impulsivity of SHRSP was not improved by methylphenidate.
  • Methylphenidate alleviates the behavioral symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention.
  • Thus, juvenile male SHRSP might be a useful behavioral animal model of AD/HD, from behavioral and pharmacological perspectives.

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  • (PMID = 12690641.001).
  • [ISSN] 1340-2544
  • [Journal-full-title] Nihon shinkei seishin yakurigaku zasshi = Japanese journal of psychopharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Shinkei Seishin Yakurigaku Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Central Nervous System Stimulants; 207ZZ9QZ49 / Methylphenidate
  • [Number-of-references] 80
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62. Zou LB, Yamada K, Nabeshima T: Sigma receptor ligands (+)-SKF10,047 and SA4503 improve dizocilpine-induced spatial memory deficits in rats. Eur J Pharmacol; 1998 Aug 14;355(1):1-10
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. DIZOCILPINE .

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  • This study examined the effects of the sigma receptor ligands (+)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)-SKF10,047) and 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride (SA4503) on dizocilpine-induced impairment of working and reference memory in a radial arm maze task in rats.
  • Dizocilpine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, significantly impaired both reference and working memory, an effect which was accompanied by ataxia and impairment of food intake.
  • SA4503 also attenuated the dizocilpine-induced working memory impairment, although (+)-SKF10,047 had no effect.
  • Neither sigma receptor ligand affected the behavioral symptoms such as ataxia and impairment of food intake induced by dizocilpine.

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  • (PMID = 9754932.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-2999
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Pharmacol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists; 0 / Nootropic Agents; 0 / Piperazines; 0 / Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate; 0 / Receptors, sigma; 0 / SA 4503; 6LR8C1B66Q / Dizocilpine Maleate; 7619-35-4 / SK&F 10047; J0ND6N0AQC / Phenazocine
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63. Montgomery RW, Ayllon T: Eye movement desensitization across subjects: subjective and physiological measures of treatment efficacy. J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry; 1994 Sep;25(3):217-30
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

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  • Dependent variables included self-report information (SUDs, behavioral symptoms reports) and physiological data (heart rate and systolic blood pressure).
  • This study appears to corroborate previous work employing single-case design as well as pre and postcomparisons.

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  • (PMID = 7852604.001).
  • [ISSN] 0005-7916
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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64. Kourtesis I, Kasparov S, Verkade P, Teschemacher AG: Ultrastructural Correlates of Enhanced Norepinephrine and Neuropeptide Y Cotransmission in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Brain. ASN Neuro; 2015 Sep-Oct;7(5)
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  • The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) replicates many clinically relevant features of human essential hypertension and also exhibits behavioral symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and dementia.
  • Nevertheless, numerous studies including our own work have revealed striking differences in central catecholaminergic transmission in SHR such as increased vesicular catecholamine content in the ventral brainstem.
  • In locus coeruleus and rostral ventrolateral medulla, but not in nucleus tractus solitarius, of SHR, noradrenergic and adrenergic vesicles were significantly larger and showed increased NPY colocalization when compared with Wistar rats.

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  • [Copyright] © The Author(s) 2015.
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  • (PMID = 26514659.001).
  • [ISSN] 1759-0914
  • [Journal-full-title] ASN neuro
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ASN Neuro
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / British Heart Foundation / / FS/09/032/27603; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / MR/J013110/1; United Kingdom / Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council / / BB/K009192/1; United Kingdom / Medical Research Council / / MR/L020661/1; United Kingdom / Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council / / BB/L019396/1
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neuropeptide Y; X4W3ENH1CV / Norepinephrine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4641560
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; electron microscopy / hypertension / locus coeruleus / nucleus tractus solitarius / rostral ventrolateral medulla / transmitter release
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65. Jennings LA, Reuben DB, Evertson LC, Serrano KS, Ercoli L, Grill J, Chodosh J, Tan Z, Wenger NS: Unmet needs of caregivers of individuals referred to a dementia care program. J Am Geriatr Soc; 2015 Feb;63(2):282-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVES: To characterize caregiver strain, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy for managing dementia-related problems and the relationship between these and referring provider type.
  • MEASUREMENTS: Caregivers were surveyed and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) about themselves; the Modified Caregiver Strain Index; the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire, which measures patient symptom severity and related caregiver distress; and a nine-item caregiver self-efficacy scale developed for the study.
  • RESULTS: Of 307 patient-caregiver dyads surveyed over a 1-year period, 32% of caregivers reported confidence in managing dementia-related problems, 19% knew how to access community services to help provide care, and 28% agreed that the individual's provider helped them work through dementia care problems.
  • Thirty-eight percent reported high levels of caregiver strain, and 15% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms.
  • Caregivers of individuals referred by geriatricians more often reported having a healthcare professional to help work through dementia care problems than those referred by internists, family physicians, or other specialists, but self-efficacy did not differ.
  • Low caregiver self-efficacy was associated with higher caregiver strain, more caregiver depressive symptoms, and caring for an individual with more-severe behavioral symptoms.

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  • [Copyright] © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.
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  • (PMID = 25688604.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-5415
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Geriatr Soc
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / P30 AG028748; United States / NCATS NIH HHS / TR / UL1 TR000124; United States / PHS HHS / / 1C1CMS330982-01-00; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / 5P30AG028748
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Observational Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS640460; NLM/ PMC4332558
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; caregiver strain / dementia / primary care
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66. Khayat S, Kheirkhah M, Behboodi Moghadam Z, Fanaei H, Kasaeian A, Javadimehr M: Effect of treatment with ginger on the severity of premenstrual syndrome symptoms. ISRN Obstet Gynecol; 2014;2014:792708

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of treatment with ginger on the severity of premenstrual syndrome symptoms.
  • Although the etiology of PMS is not clear, to relieve from this syndrome different methods are recommended.
  • This study was carried out to evaluate effects of ginger on severity of symptoms of PMS.
  • This study was a clinical trial, double-blinded work, and participants were randomly allocated to intervention (n = 35) and control (n = 35) groups.
  • After identification, each participant received two ginger capsules daily from seven days before menstruation to three days after menstruation for three cycles and they recorded severity of the symptoms by daily record scale questionnaire.
  • Before intervention, there were no significant differences between the mean scores of PMS symptoms in the two groups, but after 1, 2, and 3 months of treatment, there was a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.0001).
  • Based on the results of this study, maybe ginger is effective in the reduction of severity of mood and physical and behavioral symptoms of PMS and we suggest ginger as treatment for PMS.

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  • (PMID = 24944825.001).
  • [ISSN] 2090-4436
  • [Journal-full-title] ISRN obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ISRN Obstet Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4040198
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67. Bloom GS: Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. JAMA Neurol; 2014 Apr;71(4):505-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD) include conspicuous changes in both brain histology and behavior.
  • The AD brain is characterized microscopically by the combined presence of 2 classes of abnormal structures, extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, both of which comprise highly insoluble, densely packed filaments.
  • The behavioral symptoms of AD correlate with the accumulation of plaques and tangles, and they are a direct consequence of the damage and destruction of synapses that mediate memory and cognition.
  • During the past dozen years, a steadily accumulating body of evidence has indicated that soluble forms of Aβ and tau work together, independently of their accumulation into plaques and tangles, to drive healthy neurons into the diseased state and that hallmark toxic properties of Aβ require tau.
  • Therefore, Aβ is upstream of tau in AD pathogenesis and triggers the conversion of tau from a normal to a toxic state, but there is also evidence that toxic tau enhances Aβ toxicity via a feedback loop.
  • Because soluble toxic aggregates of both Aβ and tau can self-propagate and spread throughout the brain by prionlike mechanisms, successful therapeutic intervention for AD would benefit from detecting these species before plaques, tangles, and cognitive impairment become evident and from interfering with the destructive biochemical pathways that they initiate.

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  • (PMID = 24493463.001).
  • [ISSN] 2168-6157
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / T32GM008136
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amyloid beta-Peptides; 0 / tau Proteins
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68. Anticevic A, Corlett PR: Cognition-emotion dysinteraction in schizophrenia. Front Psychol; 2012;3:392

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Evolving theories of schizophrenia emphasize a "disconnection" in distributed fronto-striatal-limbic neural systems, which may give rise to breakdowns in cognition and emotional function.
  • We discuss these diverse domains of function from the perspective of disrupted neural circuits involved in "cold" cognitive vs. "hot" affective operations and the interplay between these processes.
  • We review recent evidence suggesting that motivational abnormalities in schizophrenia may in part arise due to a disrupted ability to "maintain" affective information over time.
  • We review emerging evidence suggesting deficits in some, but not other, specific emotional processes in schizophrenia - namely an intact ability to perceive emotion "in-the-moment" but poor prospective valuation of stimuli and heightened reactivity to stimuli that ought to be filtered.
  • We conclude with a brief treatment of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and the need to close our explanatory gap between cellular-level hypotheses and complex behavioral symptoms observed in this illness.

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  • (PMID = 23091464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1664-1078
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in psychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front Psychol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIH HHS / OD / DP5 OD012109; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / P50 AA012870; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / UL1 RR024139
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3470461
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; amygdala / cognition / cortical disinhibition / delusions / emotion / fronto-striatal circuits / schizophrenia / working memory
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69. Ziermans T, Dumontheil I, Roggeman C, Peyrard-Janvid M, Matsson H, Kere J, Klingberg T: Working memory brain activity and capacity link MAOA polymorphism to aggressive behavior during development. Transl Psychiatry; 2012;2:e85
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  • [Title] Working memory brain activity and capacity link MAOA polymorphism to aggressive behavior during development.
  • A developmental increase in working memory capacity is an important part of cognitive development, and low working memory (WM) capacity is a risk factor for developing psychopathology.
  • Behavioral problems were evaluated using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).
  • Increased activity in this network, but not in caudate nucleus or anterior prefrontal regions, was correlated with VSWM capacity, which in turn predicted externalizing (aggressive/oppositional) symptoms, with higher WM capacity associated with fewer externalizing symptoms.
  • There were no direct significant correlations between rs6609257 and behavioral symptoms.

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  • (PMID = 22832821.001).
  • [ISSN] 2158-3188
  • [Journal-full-title] Translational psychiatry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transl Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DRD5 protein, human; 0 / Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins; 0 / SLC6A3 protein, human; 137750-34-6 / Receptors, Dopamine D4; 137750-35-7 / Receptors, Dopamine D5; EC 1.14.17.1 / Dopamine beta-Hydroxylase; EC 1.4.3.4 / Monoamine Oxidase; S88TT14065 / Oxygen; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3309555
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70. Winders Davis D, Burns B: Problems of self-regulation: a new way to view deficits in children born prematurely. Issues Ment Health Nurs; 2001 Apr-May;22(3):305-23
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  • Low birth rate children are at increased risk for psychiatric and behavioral symptoms especially those related to attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders.
  • The study of self-regulation (SR) of cognition and the factors that may influence the development of regulatory capacity are suggested as a way to frame future work.


71. Burke JR, Morgenlander JC: Managing common behavioral problems in dementia. How to improve quality of life for patients and families. Postgrad Med; 1999 Oct 15;106(5):131-4, 139-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Managing common behavioral problems in dementia. How to improve quality of life for patients and families.
  • Dementia is the most common reason for nursing home placement, and related behavioral symptoms are the primary factors precipitating the decision.
  • Working with families to institute effective management strategies may help delay institutionalization.

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  • (PMID = 10560472.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-5481
  • [Journal-full-title] Postgraduate medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postgrad Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Psychotropic Drugs
  • [Number-of-references] 10
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72. Marusov IV, Bogdanov EG, Marusova IB: [The potential antinarcotic effects of guanfacine]. Eksp Klin Farmakol; 1996 May-Jun;59(3):24-7
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  • alpha 2-Agonist clonidine has been used for several years in the detoxification of opiate-addicts since it reduces withdrawal symptoms in man although craving for narcotic is not well suppressed.
  • In the present work the potential "anticraving" properties of another alpha 2-agonist guanfacine were studied in rats trained to self-administer morphine.
  • In the special series of experiments the influence of guanfacine on behavioral manifestation of morphine withdrawal in rats was studied.
  • These findings can be interpreted as reduction of morphine's positive reinforcing properties by guanfacine and point out on the possibility to prevent morphine abuse by guanfacine.
  • Morphine discontinuation and injection of naloxone (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 6 induced the behavioral symptoms of abstinence ("wet dog shakes" and jumping).
  • Guanfacine (4 mg/kg, i.p., immediately after naloxone) significantly increased the number of jumps and locomotions (p < 0.05), while increase in "wet dog shakes" was not statistically significant.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists / pharmacology. Animals. Behavior, Animal / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Interactions. Male. Morphine / administration & dosage. Naloxone / pharmacology. Narcotics / administration & dosage. Prazosin / pharmacology. Rats. Self Administration. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / physiopathology. Time Factors. Yohimbine / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 8974578.001).
  • [ISSN] 0869-2092
  • [Journal-full-title] Eksperimental'naia i klinicheskaia farmakologiia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eksp Klin Farmakol
  • [Language] rus
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] RUSSIA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists; 0 / Narcotic Antagonists; 0 / Narcotics; 2Y49VWD90Q / Yohimbine; 30OMY4G3MK / Guanfacine; 36B82AMQ7N / Naloxone; 76I7G6D29C / Morphine; XM03YJ541D / Prazosin
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73. Corredor CA, Castillo CS: [Other Possible Clinical Applications of Drugs with 5HT2A effect in Liaison Psychiatry: Cases Report]. Rev Colomb Psiquiatr; 2012 Mar;41(1):217-29

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Transliterated title] Otras posibles aplicaciones clínicas de fármacos con efecto 5HT2A y 3 en psiquiatría de enlace: reporte de casos.
  • INTRODUCTION: In liaison psychiatry it is possible to get an integral view of patient's treatment and needs, paying special attention to pharmacological interactions and contraindications.
  • RESULTS: We describe 3 cases of patients in which Mirtazapine and Olanzapine were necessary not only to control psychiatric symptoms (affective / behavioral symptoms and insomnia) but to act as adjuvant therapy in axis III diseases.
  • The use of any drug in psychiatry must take in to account the context of the patient, the presence of comorbidity, contraindications and pharmacological interactions so as to grant a positive outcome also promoting the multidisciplinary work between specialists.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 26573480.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-7450
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista colombiana de psiquiatría
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Colomb Psiquiatr
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Colombia
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Mirtazapina / Mirtazapine / encefalopatía / encephalopathy / hiperalgesia / hyperalgesia / olanzapina / olanzapine / tinitus / tinnitus
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74. Zhang N, Zhong P, Shin SM, Metallo J, Danielson E, Olsen CM, Liu QS, Lee SH: S-SCAM, a rare copy number variation gene, induces schizophrenia-related endophenotypes in transgenic mouse model. J Neurosci; 2015 Feb 4;35(5):1892-904
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  • In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit.
  • Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions.
  • These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation.
  • Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351892-13$15.00/0.
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  • (PMID = 25653350.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-2401
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurosci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA035217; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / R56 MH101146
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acvrinp1 protein, mouse; 0 / Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing; 0 / Amino Acids; 0 / Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic; 0 / LY 379268; 0 / Parvalbumins; 0 / Receptors, AMPA; 3KX376GY7L / Glutamic Acid; EC 2.7.4.8 / Guanylate Kinase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4315826
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CNV / S-SCAM/MAGI-2 / animal model / glutamatergic / schizophrenia / sexual dimorphism
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75. Widenhorn-Müller K, Schwanda S, Scholz E, Spitzer M, Bode H: Effect of supplementation with long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on behavior and cognition in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a randomized placebo-controlled intervention trial. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids; 2014 Jul-Aug;91(1-2):49-60
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether supplementation with the long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) affects behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairments in children 6-12 years of age diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Further outcome variables were working memory, speed of information processing and various measures of attention.
  • RESULTS: Supplementation with the omega-3 fatty acid mix increased EPA and DHA concentrations in erythrocyte membranes and improved working memory function, but had no effect on other cognitive measures and parent- and teacher-rated behavior in the study population.
  • Improved working memory correlated significantly with increased EPA, DHA and decreased AA (arachidonic acid).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 24958525.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-2823
  • [Journal-full-title] Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Scotland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 25167-62-8 / Docosahexaenoic Acids; 27YG812J1I / Arachidonic Acid; AAN7QOV9EA / Eicosapentaenoic Acid
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) / Behavior / Children / Intervention / Polyunsaturated fatty acids/erythrocyte membrane composition / Working memory
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76. Brocki KC, Nyberg L, Thorell LB, Bohlin G: Early concurrent and longitudinal symptoms of ADHD and ODD: relations to different types of inhibitory control and working memory. J Child Psychol Psychiatry; 2007 Oct;48(10):1033-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Early concurrent and longitudinal symptoms of ADHD and ODD: relations to different types of inhibitory control and working memory.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to investigate how three different types of inhibitory control - interference control within task, interference control outside task, and prepotent response inhibition - and two types of working memory - verbal and spatial - would relate to early symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), both concurrently and longitudinally.
  • METHODS: Seventy-two preschoolers, 1/3 who had been identified as being at risk for developing ADHD and/or ODD, completed neuropsychological tasks designed to measure inhibitory control and working memory.
  • Behavioral symptoms were measured through parental and teacher ratings of the DSM-IV criteria for ADHD and ODD.
  • RESULTS: Our results suggest distinct types of inhibitory control as being good predictors of concurrent and longitudinal symptoms of ADHD, rather than ODD.
  • However, no associations were obtained between working memory and ADHD or ODD symptoms either concurrently or longitudinally.

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  • (PMID = 17915004.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9630
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Child Psychol Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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77. Howson AL, Batth S, Ilivitsky V, Boisjoli A, Jaworski M, Mahoney C, Knott VJ: Clinical and attentional effects of acute nicotine treatment in Tourette's syndrome. Eur Psychiatry; 2004 Apr;19(2):102-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Evidence from pre-clinical infrahuman investigations, open-label clinical trials, and a single controlled trial found acute nicotine treatment potentiated up to 4 weeks neuroleptic-induced reductions of dyskinetic symptoms characterizing Tourette's syndrome (TS).
  • Given the attentional disturbances associated with this syndrome, and the improvements in attentional processes reported with nicotine, this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial examined the acute (4 h) and sustained (2 weeks) effects of a single dose of transdermal nicotine on clinical (i.e., tics), attentional (continuous performance task, event-related potential, patient and parental reports) and behavioral symptoms in 23 children and adolescents with TS receiving neuroleptic treatment.
  • In the 14 evaluable patients with complete primary efficacy data, nicotine (compared to placebo) failed to alter symptoms at 4 h but counteracted ERP-P300 signs of diminished attention seen 2 weeks following placebo treatment.
  • Secondary efficacy measures, including patient self-reports and parental ratings, found nicotine to reduce complex tics and improve behaviors related to inattention.
  • Additional work with intermittent dosing schedules is required to characterize optimal clinical and cognitive effects with nicotine treatment.
  • [MeSH-minor] Administration, Cutaneous. Adolescent. Analysis of Variance. Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use. Child. Double-Blind Method. Electroencephalography. Evoked Potentials / drug effects. Female. Humans. Male. Reaction Time / drug effects. Severity of Illness Index. Task Performance and Analysis. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome. Videotape Recording

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  • (PMID = 15132126.001).
  • [ISSN] 0924-9338
  • [Journal-full-title] European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. Psychiatry
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antipsychotic Agents; 0 / Ganglionic Stimulants; 6M3C89ZY6R / Nicotine
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78. Harris JS: Development, use, and evaluation of clinical practice guidelines. J Occup Environ Med; 1997 Jan;39(1):23-34

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The information developed for guidelines can also be used for patient discussion and expectation management.
  • Guidelines should be explicit, be based on a review of the available evidence and benefits vs risks, have clear medical logic, link findings to diagnosis to treatment ot prevention, be time-based, and avoid recommending unproven approaches as a last resort.
  • The contents of a useful occupational health guideline would include a statement of purpose and scope, the method of development; the authors' and reviewers names and affiliations; an analysis of the specificity, sensitivity, and predictive power of mechanisms of illness or injury, symptoms, signs and tests; findings that point to a serious or emergent condition requiring immediate referral or treatment; diagnostic criteria; and initial treatment, including work with the patient in a therapeutic partnership.
  • The guideline should also present information on factors known to be associated with work, and predictors of delayed recovery.
  • A discussion of management after reassessment, including behavioral referral, further testing, and procedures, is also quite useful.
  • Recommendations for restoration of function and return to work complete guidelines focused on diagnosing, treating, and resolving activity limitations among workers.
  • Simply developing and publishing guidelines has not resulted in improvement in practice.

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  • (PMID = 9029428.001).
  • [ISSN] 1076-2752
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Occup. Environ. Med.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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79. Papp P, Imber-Black E: Family themes: transmission and transformation. Fam Process; 1996 Mar;35(1):5-20

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • In this method, behavioral symptoms are framed as a current manifestation of an overarching theme.
  • This orientation enables family and therapist to de-pathologize symptoms and work collaboratively toward change.

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  • (PMID = 8964285.001).
  • [ISSN] 0014-7370
  • [Journal-full-title] Family process
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Fam Process
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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80. Tunnadine P: Psychosexual problems. Practitioner; 1985 May;229(1403):453-5, 457
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  • When seeking contraceptive consultation, the patient must have no conscious or unconscious anxiety about her desire for sexual pleasure without pregnancy and is entitled to assume, when seeking such advice, that the doctor who offers it has no such prejudices either.
  • When the presenting symptom relates to otherwise illogical contraceptive difficulty, or otherwise invites examination of the genitals, one may suspect that the problem may be sexual and too difficult to express in other than the physical language the patient expects the physician to want.
  • Yet, at this point, the doctor's anxiety often replaces the patient's since the management of psychosomatic disorders is not part of normal medical training.
  • Skill in dealing with such common dilemmas in the context of the brief period allotted to each patient cannot be obtained from a short article, but it is worthwhile for a physician, confronted with a patient whose symptoms do not make sense, to ask what the symptom itself may indicate in terms of the unspoken problem at hand.
  • Most family doctors who understand the training of the Institute of Psychosexual Medicine find their brief psychosomatic approach more appropriate to their everyday work than time-consuming behavioral sex therapy and more appropriate to patients who present their problems in the surgery.
  • Those who have no inclination for such training will make more accurate diagnoses if they are aware that nonverbal clues may say more than words and that referral to a colleague trained in psychosexual medicine may be more fruitful than one which only reinforces the patient's sense of inadequacy and abnormality.

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  • (PMID = 4011573.001).
  • [ISSN] 0032-6518
  • [Journal-full-title] The Practitioner
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Practitioner
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Other-IDs] PIP/ 033589; POP/ 00160557
  • [Keywords] PIP ; Attitude (major topic) / Behavior (major topic) / Case Studies (major topic) / Communication (major topic) / Contraception (major topic) / Delivery Of Health Care (major topic) / Family Planning (major topic) / Health Personnel (major topic) / Interpersonal Relations (major topic) / Physician-patient Relations (major topic) / Physicians (major topic) / Psychological Factors (major topic) / Sex Behavior (major topic) / Health / Research Methodology / Studies
  • [General-notes] PIP/ TJ: PRACTITIONER.
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81. Raşcu A, Moise L, Naghi E, Handra C, Oţelea M, Raşcu A, Lăcătuşu L: Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in a Railroad Controller Worker. Rom J Intern Med; 2015 Jan-Mar;53(1):89-94
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  • Consequentially to the induced co-morbidities, the mortality reaches as high as 39% at eight years time lapse from the initial diagnostic.
  • Here below, we are presenting the case of a 49 years old patient, railroad controller worker, non-smoker and occasionally alcohol user, who was hospitalized in our Clinic for Occupational Medicine.
  • During last year, the patient was accusing excessive daytime somnolence, breath arrests during sleep, intense snoring, morning headaches, morning oral dryness, pin point chest pain, nocturia (4-5 nocturnal urination), concentration difficulties and an overall reduced work capacity.
  • (1) Behavioral therapy (weight loss) and (2) CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) therapy which was instituted immediately after the positive diagnosis was made.
  • As a consequence, the respiratory symptoms, the frequent episodes of daytime snoozing and the concentration difficulties at work place diminished considerably.

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  • (PMID = 26076566.001).
  • [ISSN] 1220-4749
  • [Journal-full-title] Romanian journal of internal medicine = Revue roumaine de médecine interne
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rom J Intern Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Romania
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82. Posada C, Moore DJ, Woods SP, Vigil O, Ake C, Perry W, Hassanein TI, Letendre SL, Grant I, HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center Group: Implications of hepatitis C virus infection for behavioral symptoms and activities of daily living. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol; 2010 Jul;32(6):637-44
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Implications of hepatitis C virus infection for behavioral symptoms and activities of daily living.
  • Despite these previous findings, little work has been done to examine neurobehavioral symptoms associated with HCV infection.
  • Results showed that at the group level, only the FrSBe apathy subscale mean was clinically elevated (T score >65) among HCV+ persons; executive dysfunction, disinhibition, and total subscale means were not clinically elevated.
  • These results show that a subset of HCV-infected individuals report clinically elevated behavioral symptoms.
  • Clinical implications for the assessment and management of elevated behavioral symptoms in HCV are discussed.

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  • (PMID = 20603743.001).
  • [ISSN] 1744-411X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Exp Neuropsychol
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / MH 62512-07; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P01DA12065-08; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA012065-08; United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / P30 MH062512; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P01 DA012065; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / P01 DA012065-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS203317; NLM/ PMC2898888
  • [Investigator] Grant I; Atkinson JH; Ellis RJ; McCutchan JA; Marcotte TD; Sherman M; Hale BR; Ellis RJ; McCutchan JA; Letendre S; Capparelli E; Schrier R; Marquie-Beck J; Alexander T; Heaton RK; Cherner M; Woods SP; Moore DJ; Dawson M; Jernigan T; Fennema-Notestine C; Archibald SL; Hesselink J; Annese J; Taylor MJ; Schweinsburg B; Masliah E; Everall I; Achim C; Richman D; McCutchan JA; Everall I; Lipton S; McCutchan JA; Atkinson JH; Ellis RJ; Letendre S; Atkinson JH; von Jaeger R; Gamst AC; Cushman C; Masys DR; Abramson I; Vaida F; Ake C
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83. Bark R, Dieckmann S, Bogerts B, Northoff G: Deficit in decision making in catatonic schizophrenia: an exploratory study. Psychiatry Res; 2005 Apr 15;134(2):131-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Catatonic schizophrenia can be distinguished from paranoid schizophrenia by prominent behavioral and motor anomalies.
  • As demonstrated in recent imaging studies, behavioral symptoms may be related to dysfunction in the ventral prefrontal cortex.
  • The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the Object Alternation Task (OAT) served as measures of ventral prefrontal cortical function.
  • In addition, other prefrontal cortical tests such as a visual working memory task, a Go-NoGo task, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, as well as attentional tasks, were included in the test battery.
  • In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest a specific deficit in catatonic schizophrenia in those neuropsychological measures that are associated with ventral prefrontal cortical function.

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  • (PMID = 15840414.001).
  • [ISSN] 0165-1781
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychiatry research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychiatry Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
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84. Chiaravalloti ND, DeLuca J: Assessing the behavioral consequences of multiple sclerosis: an application of the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe). Cogn Behav Neurol; 2003 Mar;16(1):54-67
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Assessing the behavioral consequences of multiple sclerosis: an application of the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe).
  • OBJECTIVE: The current study examines the utility of the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe) to document behavioral changes in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
  • As a result, behavioral symptoms may present, including disorders of executive functioning, apathy, and disinhibition.
  • RESULTS: Behavioral ratings for the MS group prior to illness were equivalent to those of the HC group.
  • Relationships were also noted between the FrSBe family and self-report forms after illness and measures of neuropsychological performance, particularly information processing, working memory, and executive control.
  • In contrast, physical disease progression was correlated with family ratings of behavior, but not self-ratings.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The FrSBe appears to be a sensitive measure of behavioral change in people with MS.
  • Self-ratings and family ratings of behavioral changes are related to measures of neuropsychological performance.
  • However, physical symptoms of MS are related only to the family ratings of behavior.

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  • (PMID = 14765002.001).
  • [ISSN] 1543-3633
  • [Journal-full-title] Cognitive and behavioral neurology : official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cogn Behav Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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85. Burgunder JM, Guttman M, Perlman S, Goodman N, van Kammen DP, Goodman L: An International Survey-based Algorithm for the Pharmacologic Treatment of Chorea in Huntington's Disease. PLoS Curr; 2011 Aug 30;3:RRN1260

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The HD chorea research literature fails to address the indications for drug treatment, drug selection, drug dosing and side effect profiles, management of inadequate response to a single drug, and preferred drug when behavioral symptoms comorbid to chorea are present.
  • Survey results showed that patient stigma, physical injury, gait instability, work interference, and disturbed sleep were indications for a drug treatment trial.
  • However, the experts did not agree on first choice of chorea drug, with the majority of experts in Europe favoring an antipsychotic drug (APD), and a near equal split in first choice between an APD and tetrabenazine (TBZ) among experts from North America and Australia.

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  • (PMID = 21975581.001).
  • [ISSN] 2157-3999
  • [Journal-full-title] PLoS currents
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS Curr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3166256.1
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86. Woods DL, Mentes JC: Spit: saliva in nursing research, uses and methodological considerations in older adults. Biol Res Nurs; 2011 Jul;13(3):320-7
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYDROCORTISONE .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • There are numerous advantages to using saliva as a biological fluid, particularly for nurse researchers working with vulnerable populations, such as frail older adults.
  • The authors describe their experiences with the use of saliva in research with older adults that examined (a) osmolality as an indicator of hydration status and (b) cortisol and behavioral symptoms of dementia.
  • For example, it is not enough to detect levels or rely solely on summary statistics; rather it is critical to characterize any rhythmicity inherent in the parameter of interest.
  • Not accounting for rhythmicity in the analysis and interpretation of data can limit the interpretation of associations, thus impeding advances related to the contribution that an altered rhythm may make to individual vulnerability.

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dehydration.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dementia.
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  • (PMID = 21586500.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-4175
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological research for nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol Res Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] WI4X0X7BPJ / Hydrocortisone
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87. Karenberg A, Förstl H: Dementia in the Greco-Roman world. J Neurol Sci; 2006 May 15;244(1-2):5-9
MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dementia.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Several classical sources--some of them medical--offer intriguing descriptions of many cognitive and behavioral symptoms in dementia, which are currently used for diagnostic purposes.
  • Only a small part of this early literature is cited in contemporary work on the origin of the dementia concept, which can be clearly traced back to the Age of Enlightenment and whose earlier history still needs to be elucidated.

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  • (PMID = 16442123.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-510X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the neurological sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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88. Proietti L, Longo B, Duscio D: [Suspected glutaraldehyde poisoning: a case report]. Med Lav; 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):43-7
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